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Psalms 91:7

    Psalms 91:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    A thousand shall fall at thy side, and ten thousand at thy right hand; but it shall not come nigh thee.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    A thousand shall fall at your side, and ten thousand at your right hand; but it shall not come near you.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    A thousand shall fall at thy side, And ten thousand at thy right hand; But it shall not come nigh thee.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    You will see a thousand falling by your side, and ten thousand at your right hand; but it will not come near you.

    Webster's Revision

    A thousand shall fall at thy side, And ten thousand at thy right hand; But it shall not come nigh thee.

    World English Bible

    A thousand may fall at your side, and ten thousand at your right hand; but it will not come near you.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    A thousand shall fall at thy side, and ten thousand at thy right hand; but it shall not come nigh thee.

    Definitions for Psalms 91:7

    Nigh - Near.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 91:7

    A thousand shall fall at thy side - Calmet thinks this place should be translated thus: "A thousand enemies may fall upon thee on one side, and ten thousand may fall upon thee on thy right hand: but they shall not come nigh thee to take away thy life." It is a promise of perfect protection, and the utmost safety.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 91:7

    A thousand shall fall at thy side - Though a thousand should fall at thy side, or close to thee. This alludes to the manner in which the pestilence often moves among people.

    And ten thousand at thy right hand - Compare Psalm 3:6. The word "myriad" would better represent the exact idea in the original, as the Hebrew word is different from that which is translated "a thousand." It is put here for any large number. No matter how many fall around thee, on the right hand and the left, you will have nothing to fear.

    But it shall not come nigh thee - You will be safe. You may feel assured of the divine protection. Your mind may be calm through a sense of such guardianship, and your very calmness will conduce to your safety. This refers, as remarked above, to a "general" law in regard to the judgments of God. It is true that others, beside the dissipated, vicious, and debased, may be the victims; but the great law is that temperance, soberness, virtue, cleanliness, and that regard to comfort and health to which religion and virtue prompt, constitute a marked security - so marked as to illustrate the "general" law referred to in the psalm before us.