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Psalms 98:9

    Psalms 98:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Before the LORD; for he cometh to judge the earth: with righteousness shall he judge the world, and the people with equity.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Before the LORD; for he comes to judge the earth: with righteousness shall he judge the world, and the people with equity.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Before Jehovah; for he cometh to judge the earth: He will judge the world with righteousness, And the peoples with equity.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Before the Lord, for he has come as judge of the earth; judging the world in righteousness, and giving true decisions for the peoples.

    Webster's Revision

    Before Jehovah; for he cometh to judge the earth: He will judge the world with righteousness, And the peoples with equity.

    World English Bible

    Let them sing before Yahweh, for he comes to judge the earth. He will judge the world with righteousness, and the peoples with equity.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Before the LORD, for he cometh to judge the earth: he shall judge the world with righteousness, and the peoples with equity.

    Definitions for Psalms 98:9

    Equity - A letter sent.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 98:9

    For he cometh to judge the earth - He comes to make known his salvation, and show his merciful designs to all the children of men.

    With righteousness shall he judge the world - His word shall not be confined; all shall know him, from the least to the greatest: he shall show that he is loving to every man, and hateth nothing that he hath made. See the notes on Psalm 96:1-13 (note). There is a very great similarity between this Psalm and the Song or Magnificat of the Blessed Virgin. I shall note some of the parallels, chiefly from Bishop Nicholson.

    This Psalm is an evident prophecy of Christ's coming to save the world; and what is here foretold by David is, in the Blessed Virgin's song, chanted forth as being accomplished. David is the Voice, and Mary is the Echo.

    1. David "O sing unto the Lord a new song." (The Voice).

    Mary "My soul doth magnify the Lord." (The Echo).

    2. David "He hath done marvellous things." (The Voice).

    Mary "He that is mighty hath done great things." (The Echo).

    3. David "With his own right hand and holy arm hath he gotten himself the victory." (The Voice).

    Mary "He hath showed strength with his arm and scattered the proud in the imagination of their hearts." (The Echo).

    4. David "The Lord hath made known his salvation; his righteousness hath he openly showed," etc. (The Voice).

    Mary "His mercy is on them that fear him, from generation to generation." (The Echo).

    5. David "He hath remembered his mercy and his truth toward the house of Israel." (The Voice).

    Mary "He hath holpen his servant Israel in remembrance of his mercy." (The Echo).

    These parallels are very striking; and it seems as if Mary had this Psalm in her eye when she composed her song of triumph. And this is a farther argument that the whole Psalm, whether it record the deliverance of Israel from Egypt, or the Jews from the Babylonish captivity, is yet to be ultimately understood of the redemption of the world by Jesus Christ, and the proclamation of his Gospel through all the nations of the earth: and taken in this view, no language can be too strong, nor poetic imagery too high, to point out the unsearchable riches of Christ.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 98:9

    Before the Lord, for he cometh to judge the earth ... - This verse is essentially the same as Psalm 96:13. See the notes at that verse. The psalm calls for universal praise. The very "reading" of the psalm - so joyous - so jubilant - so animated - so exulting - is suited to awaken the mind to praise; to rouse it to thankfulness; to fill it with joy. One cannot read the psalm without being a happier man; without being lifted above the world; without lofty views of God; without a feeling that he is worthy of this universal praise; without recognizing that we are in a world where the mind should be joyful; that we are under the dominion of a God whose reign should fill the mind with gladness.