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Revelation 14:13

    Revelation 14:13 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me, Write, Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth: Yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labours; and their works do follow them.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And I heard a voice from heaven saying to me, Write, Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from now on: Yes, said the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors; and their works do follow them.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And I heard the voice from heaven saying, Write, Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord from henceforth: yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors; for their works follow with them.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And a voice from heaven came to my ears, saying, Put in writing, There is a blessing on the dead who from now on come to their end in the Lord: yes, says the Spirit, that they may have rest from their troubles; for their works go with them.

    Webster's Revision

    And I heard the voice from heaven saying, Write, Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord from henceforth: yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors; for their works follow with them.

    World English Bible

    I heard the voice from heaven saying, "Write, 'Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord from now on.'" "Yes," says the Spirit, "that they may rest from their labors; for their works follow with them."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And I heard a voice from heaven saying, Write, Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth: yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labours; for their works follow with them.

    Definitions for Revelation 14:13

    Blessed - Happy.
    Henceforth - From this time forth; from now on.
    Yea - Yes; certainly.

    Clarke's Commentary on Revelation 14:13

    I heard a voice from heaven - As the information now to be given was of the utmost importance, it is solemnly communicated by a voice from heaven; and the apostle is commanded to write or record what is said.

    Blessed are the dead - Happy are they. They are happy in two respects:

    1. They do not see the evil that shall come upon the world, and are exempted from any farther sufferings.

    2. They actually and conscientiously enjoy happiness in a state of blessedness.

    In the first sense, Happy are the dead! is a proverb frequently to be met in the Greek and Roman poets. Ex. gr.

    Τρις μακαρες Δαναοι και τετρακις, οἱ τοτ' ολοντο

    Τροιῃ εν ευρειη, χαριν Ατρειδῃσι φεροντες.

    Ὡς δη εγωγ' οφελον θανεειν και ποτμον επισπειν

    Ηματι τῳ, ὁτε μοι πλειστοι χαλκηρεα δουρα

    Τρωες επερῥιψαν περι Πηλειωνι θανοντι.

    Odyss., lib. v. ver. 306.

    Happy, thrice happy; who, in battle slain,

    Press'd, in Atrides' cause, the Trojan plain:

    O, had I died before that well fought wall;

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    Barnes' Notes on Revelation 14:13

    And I heard a voice from heaven - A voice that seemed to speak from heaven.

    Saying unto me, Write - Make a record of this truth. We may suppose that John was engaged in making a record of what he saw in vision; he was now instructed to make a record of what he heard. This passage may be referred to as a proof that he wrote this book while in Patmos, or as the heavenly disclosures were made to him, and not afterward from memory.

    Blessed are the dead - That is, the condition of those who die in the manner which is immediately specified, is to be regarded as a blessed or happy one. It is much to be able to say of the dead that they are "blessed." There is much in death that is sad; we so much dread it by nature; it cuts us off from so much that is dear to us; it blasts so many hopes; and the grave is so cold and cheerless a resting place, that we owe much to a system of religion which will enable us to say and to feel, that it is a blessed thing to die. Assuredly we should be grateful for any system of religion which will enable us thus to speak of those who are dead; which will enable us, with corresponding feeling, to look forward to our own departure from this world.

    Which die in the Lord - Not all the dead; for God never pronounces the condition of the wicked who die, blessed or happy. Religion guards this point, and confines the declaration to those who furnish evidence that they are prepared for heaven. The phrase "to die in the Lord" implies the following things:

    (1) That they who thus die are the friends of the Lord Jesus. The language "to be in the Lord" is often used to denote true attachment to him, or close union with him. Compare John 15:4-7; Romans 16:13, Romans 16:22; 1 Corinthians 4:17; 1 Corinthians 7:39; Philippians 1:14; Colossians 4:7. The assurance, then, is limited to those who are sincere Christians; for this the language properly implies, and we are authorized to apply it only as there is evidence of true religion.

    (2) to "die in the Lord" would seem also to imply that there should be, at the time, the evidence of his favor and friendship. This would apply:

    (a) to those who die as martyrs, giving their lives as a testimony to the truth of religion, and as an evidence of their love for it; and,

    (b) to those who have the comforting evidence of his presence and favor on the bed of death.

    From henceforth - ἀπάρτι aparti. This word has given no little perplexity to expositors, and it has been variously rendered. Some have connected it with the word "blessed" - "Blessed henceforth are the dead who die in the Lord"; that is, they will be ever-onward blessed: some with the word "die," referring to the time when the apostle was writing - "Blessed are they who, after this time, die in the Lord"; designing to comfort those who were exposed to death, and who would die as martyrs: some as referring to the times contemplated in these visions - "Blessed will they be who shall die in those future times." Witsius understands this as meaning that, from the time of their death, they would be blessed, as if it had been said, immediately after their dissolution they would be blessed. Doddridge renders it, "Henceforth blessed are the dead." The language is evidently not to be construed as implying that they who had died in the faith before were not happy, but that in the times of trial and persecution that were to come, they were to be regarded as especially blessed who should escape from these sorrows by a Christian death. Scenes of woe were indeed to occur, in which many believers would die. But their condition was not to be regarded as one of misfortune, but of blessedness and joy, for:

    (a) they would die in an honorable cause;

    (b) they would emerge from a world of sorrow; and,

    (c) they would rise to eternal life and peace.

    The design, therefore, of the verse is to impart consolation and support to those who would be exposed to a martyr's death, and to those who, in times of persecution, would see their friends exposed to such a death. It may be added that the declaration here made is true still, and ever will be. It is a blessed thing to die in the Lord.

    Yea, saith the Spirit - The Holy Spirit; "the Spirit by whose inspiration and command I record this" (Doddridge).

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