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Revelation 5:2

    Revelation 5:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And I saw a strong angel proclaiming with a loud voice, Who is worthy to open the book, and to loose the seals thereof?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And I saw a strong angel proclaiming with a loud voice, Who is worthy to open the book, and to loose the seals thereof?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And I saw a strong angel proclaiming with a great voice, Who is worthy to open the book, and to loose the seals thereof?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And I saw a strong angel saying in a loud voice, Who is able to make the book open, and to undo its stamps?

    Webster's Revision

    And I saw a strong angel proclaiming with a great voice, Who is worthy to open the book, and to loose the seals thereof?

    World English Bible

    I saw a mighty angel proclaiming with a loud voice, "Who is worthy to open the book, and to break its seals?"

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And I saw a strong angel proclaiming with a great voice, Who is worthy to open the book, and to loose the seals thereof?

    Definitions for Revelation 5:2

    Angel - Messenger.

    Clarke's Commentary on Revelation 5:2

    A strong angel - One of the chief of the angelic host.

    Proclaiming - As the herald of God.

    To open the book, and to loose the seals - To loose the seals that he may open the book. Who can tell what this book contains? Who can open its mysteries? The book may mean the purposes and designs of God relative to his government of the world and the Church; but we, whose habitation is in the dust, know nothing of such things. We are, however, determined to guess.

    Barnes' Notes on Revelation 5:2

    And I saw a strong angel - An angel endowed with great strength, as if such strength was necessary to enable him to give utterance to the loud voice of the inquiry. "Homer represents his heralds as powerful, robust men, in order consistently to attribute to them deep-toned and powerful voices" (Prof. Stuart). The inquiry to be made was one of vast importance; it was to be made of all in heaven, all on the earth, and all under the earth, and hence an angel is introduced so mighty that his voice could be heard in all those distant worlds.

    Proclaiming with a loud voice - That is, as a herald or crier. He is rather introduced here as appointed to this office than as self-moved. The design undoubtedly is to impress the mind with a sense of the importance of the disclosures about to be made, and at the same time with a sense of the impossibility of penetrating the future by any created power. That one of the highest angels should make such a proclamation would sufficiently show its importance; that such an one, by the mere act of making such a proclamation, should practically confess his own inability, and consequently the inability of all of similar rank, to make the disclosures, would show that the revelations of the future were beyond mere created power.

    Who is worthy to open the book, ... - That is, who is "worthy" in the sense of having a rank so exalted, and attributes so comprehensive, as to authorize and enable him to do it. In other words, who has the requisite endowments of all kinds to enable him to do it? It would require moral qualities of an exalted character to justify him in approaching the seat of the holy God, to take the book from his hands; it would require an ability beyond that of any created being to penetrate the future, and disclose the meaning of the symbols which were employed. The fact that the book was held in the hand of him that was on the throne, and sealed in this manner, was in itself a sufficient proof that it was not his purpose to make the disclosure directly, and the natural inquiry arose whether there was anyone in the wide universe who, by rank, or character, or office, would be empowered to open the mysterious volume.

    Wesley's Notes on Revelation 5:2

    5:2 And I saw a strong angel - This proclamation to every creature was too great for a man to make, and yet not becoming the Lamb himself. It was therefore made by an angel, and one of uncommon eminence.