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Romans 1:22

    Romans 1:22 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Seeming to be wise, they were in fact foolish,

    Webster's Revision

    Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools,

    World English Bible

    Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools,

    Definitions for Romans 1:22

    Became - Was exactly suited for; was fitting.

    Clarke's Commentary on Romans 1:22

    Professing themselves to be wise - This is most strikingly true of all the ancient philosophers, whether Greeks or Romans, as their works, which remain, sufficiently testify. The word φασκοντες signifies not merely the professing but the assumption of the philosophic character. In this sense the word φασκειν is used by the best Greek writers. See Kypke. A dispassionate examination of the doctrine and lives of the most famed philosophers of antiquity, of every nation, will show that they were darkened in their mind and irregular in their conduct. It was from the Christian religion alone that true philosophy and genuine philosophers sprang.

    Barnes' Notes on Romans 1:22

    Professing themselves to be wise - This was the common boast of the philosophers of antiquity. The very word by which they chose to be called, "philosophers," means literally "lovers of wisdom." That it was their boast that they were wise, is well known; compare Romans 1:14; 1 Corinthians 1:19, 1 Corinthians 1:20, 1 Corinthians 1:22; 1 Corinthians 3:19; 2 Corinthians 11:19.

    They became fools - Compare Jeremiah 8:8-9. They became really foolish in their opinions and conduct. There is something particularly pungent and cutting in this remark, and as true as it is pungent. In what way they evinced their folly, Paul proceeds immediately to state. Sinners of all kinds are frequently spoken of as fools in the Scriptures. In the sense in which it is thus used, the word is applied to them as void of understanding or moral sense; as idolaters, and as wicked; Psalm 14:1; Proverbs 26:4; Proverbs 1:17, Proverbs 1:22; Proverbs 14:8-9. The senses in which this word here is applied to the pagan are,

    (1) That their speculations and doctrines were senseless; and,

    (2) That their conduct was corrupt.