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Romans 13:12

    Romans 13:12 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The night is far spent, the day is at hand: let us therefore cast off the works of darkness, and let us put on the armour of light.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The night is far spent, the day is at hand: let us therefore cast off the works of darkness, and let us put on the armor of light.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    The night is far spent, and the day is at hand: let us therefore cast off the works of darkness, and let us put on the armor of light.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The night is far gone, and the day is near: so let us put off the works of the dark, arming ourselves with light,

    Webster's Revision

    The night is far spent, and the day is at hand: let us therefore cast off the works of darkness, and let us put on the armor of light.

    World English Bible

    The night is far gone, and the day is near. Let's therefore throw off the works of darkness, and let's put on the armor of light.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The night is far spent, and the day is at hand: let us therefore cast off the works of darkness, and let us put on the armour of light.

    Definitions for Romans 13:12

    Cast - Worn-out; old; cast-off.
    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Romans 13:12

    The night is far spent - If we understand this in reference to the heathen state of the Romans, it may be paraphrased thus: The night is far spent - heathenish darkness is nearly at an end. The day is at hand - the full manifestation of the Sun of righteousness, in the illumination of the whole Gentile world approaches rapidly. The manifestation of the Messiah is regularly termed by the ancient Jews יום yom, day, because previously to this all is night, Bereshith rabba sect. 91, fol. 89. Cast off the works of darkness - prepare to meet this rising light, and welcome its approach, by throwing aside superstition, impiety, and vice of every kind: and put on the armor of light - fully receive the heavenly teaching, by which your spirits will be as completely armed against the attacks of evil as your bodies could be by the best weapons and impenetrable armor. This sense seems most suitable to the following verses, where the vices of the Gentiles are particularly specified; and they are exhorted to abandon them, and to receive the Gospel of Christ. The common method of explanation is this: The night is far spent - our present imperfect life, full of afflictions, temptations, and trials, is almost run out; the day of eternal blessedness is at hand - is about to dawn on us in our glorious resurrection unto eternal life. 'Therefore, let us cast off - let us live as candidates for this eternal glory. But this sense cannot at all comport with what is said below, as the Gentiles are most evidently intended.

    Barnes' Notes on Romans 13:12

    The night - The word "night," in the New Testament, is used to denote "night" literally (Matthew 2:14, etc.); the starry heavens Revelation 8:12; and then it denotes a state of "ignorance" and "crime," and is synonymous with the word "darkness," as such deeds are committed commonly in the night; 1 Thessalonians 5:5. In this place it seems to denote our present imperfect and obscure condition in this world as contrasted with the pure light of heaven The "night," the time of comparative obscurity and sin in which we live even under the gospel, is far gone in relation to us, and the pure splendors of heaven are at hand,

    Is far spent - Literally, "is cut off." It is becoming "short;" it is hastening to a close.

    The day - The full splendors and glory of redemption in heaven. Heaven is often thus represented as a place of pure and splendid day; Revelation 21:23, Revelation 21:25; Revelation 22:5. The times of the "gospel" are represented as times of "light" (Isaiah 60:1-2; Isaiah 60:19-20, etc.); but the reference here seems to be rather to the still brighter glory and splendor of heaven, as the place of pure, unclouded, and eternal day.

    Is at hand - Is near; or is drawing near. This is true respecting all Christians. The day is near, or the time when they shall be admitted to heaven is not remote. This is the uniform representation of the New Testament; Hebrews 10:25; 1 Peter 4:7; James 5:8; Revelation 22:10; 1 Thessalonians 5:2-6; Philippians 4:5. That the apostle did not mean, however, that the end of the world was near, or that the day of judgment would come soon, is clear from his own explanations; see 1 Thessalonians 5:2-6; compare 2 Thessalonians 2.

    Let us therefore - As we are about to enter on the glories of that eternal day, we should be pure and holy. The "expectation" of it will teach us to "seek" purity; and a pure life alone will fit us to enter there; Hebrews 12:14.

    Cast off - Lay aside, or put away.

    The works of darkness - Dark, wicked deeds, such as are specified in the next verse. They are called "works of darkness," because darkness in the Scriptures is an emblem of crime, as well as of ignorance, and because such deeds are commonly committed in the night; 1 Thessalonians 5:7, "They that be drunken, are drunken in the night;" compare John 3:20; Ephesians 5:11-13.

    Let us put on - Let us clothe ourselves with.

    The armour of light - The word "armor" ὅπλα hopla properly means "arms," or instruments of war, including the helmet, sword, shield, etc. Ephesians 6:11-17. It is used in the New Testament to denote the "aids" which the Christian has, or the "means of defense" in his warfare, where he is represented as a soldier contending with his foes, and includes truth, righteousness, faith, hope, etc. as the instruments by which he is to gain his victories. In 2 Corinthians 6:7, it is called "the armor of righteousness on the right hand and on the left." It is called armor of light, because it is not to accomplish any deeds of darkness or of crime; it is appropriate to one who is pure, and who is seeking a pure and noble object. Christians are represented as the "children of light;" 1 Thessalonians 5:5; Note, Luke 16:8. By the armor of light, therefore, the apostle means those graces which stand opposed to the deeds of darkness Romans 13:13; those graces of faith, hope, humility, etc. which shall be appropriate to those who are the children of the day, and which shall be their defense in their struggles with their spiritual foes. see the description in full in Ephesians 4:11-17.