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Romans 15:1

    Romans 15:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    We then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    We then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Now we that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    We who are strong have to be a support to the feeble, and not give pleasure to ourselves.

    Webster's Revision

    Now we that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves.

    World English Bible

    Now we who are strong ought to bear the weaknesses of the weak, and not to please ourselves.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Now we that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves.

    Definitions for Romans 15:1

    Ought - Any one; any thing.

    Clarke's Commentary on Romans 15:1

    We then that are strong - The sense of this verse is supposed to be the following: We, Gentile Christians, who perfectly understand the nature of our Gospel liberty, not only lawfully may, but are bound in duty to bear any inconveniences that may arise from the scruples of the weaker brethren, and to ease their consciences by prudently abstaining from such indifferent things as may offend and trouble them; and not take advantage from our superior knowledge to make them submit to our judgment.

    Barnes' Notes on Romans 15:1

    We then that are strong - The apostle resumes the subject of the preceding chapter; and continues the exhortation to brotherly love and mutual kindness and forbearance. By the "strong" here he means the strong "in faith" in respect to the matters under discussion; those whose minds were free from doubts and perplexities. His own mind was free from doubt, and there were many others, particularly of the Gentile converts, that had the same views. But many also, particularly of the "Jewish" converts, had many doubts and scruples.

    Ought to bear - This word bear properly means to "lift up," to "bear away," to "remove." But here it is used in a larger sense; "to bear with, to be indulgent to, to endure patiently, not to contend with;" Galatians 6:2; Revelation 2:2, "Thou canst not bear them that are evil."

    And not to please ourselves - Not to make it our main object to gratify our own wills. We should be willing to deny ourselves, if by it we may promote the happiness of others. This refers particularly to "opinions" about meats and drinks; but it may be applied to Christian conduct generally, as denoting that we are not to make our own happiness or gratification the standard of our conduct, but are to seek the welfare of others; see the example of Paul, 1 Corinthians 9:19, 1 Corinthians 9:22; see also Philippians 2:4; 1 Corinthians 13:5, "Love seeketh not her own;" 1 Corinthians 10:24, "Let no man seek his own, but every man another's wealth; also Matthew 16:24.

    Wesley's Notes on Romans 15:1

    15:1 We who are strong - Of a clearer judgment, and free from these scruples. And not to please ourselves - Without any regard to others.