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Romans 15:24

    Romans 15:24 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Whensoever I take my journey into Spain, I will come to you: for I trust to see you in my journey, and to be brought on my way thitherward by you, if first I be somewhat filled with your company.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Whenever I take my journey into Spain, I will come to you: for I trust to see you in my journey, and to be brought on my way thitherward by you, if first I be somewhat filled with your company.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    whensoever I go unto Spain (for I hope to see you in my journey, and to be brought on my way thitherward by you, if first in some measure I shall have been satisfied with your company)--

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Whenever I go to Spain (for it is my hope to see you on my way, and to be sent on there by you, if first I may in some measure have been comforted by your company)--

    Webster's Revision

    whensoever I go unto Spain (for I hope to see you in my journey, and to be brought on my way thitherward by you, if first in some measure I shall have been satisfied with your company)--

    World English Bible

    whenever I journey to Spain, I will come to you. For I hope to see you on my journey, and to be helped on my way there by you, if first I may enjoy your company for a while.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    whensoever I go unto Spain (for I hope to see you in my journey, and to be brought on my way thitherward by you, if first in some measure I shall have been satisfied with your company)--

    Definitions for Romans 15:24

    Thitherward - In that direction; towards.

    Clarke's Commentary on Romans 15:24

    Whensoever I take my journey into Spain - Where it is very likely the Gospel had not yet been planted; though legendary tales inform us that St. James had planted the Gospel there long before this time, and had founded many bishoprics! But this is as unfounded as it is ridiculous and absurd; for nothing like what is now termed a bishopric, nor even a parish, was founded for many years after this. An itinerant preacher, might, with more propriety, say travelling circuits were formed, rather than bishoprics. Whether the apostle ever fulfilled his design of going to Spain is unknown; but there is no evidence whatever that he did, and the presumption is that he did not undertake this voyage. Antiquity affords no proof that he fulfilled his intention.

    I will come to you - Ελευσο μαιπρος ὑμας. These words are wanting in almost every MS. of note, and in the Syriac of Erpen, Coptic, Vulgate, Ethiopic, Armenian, and Itala. If the first clause of this verse be read in connection with the latter clause of the preceding, it will fully appear that this rejected clause is useless. Having a great desire, these many years to come unto you whensoever I take my journey into Spain: for I trust to see you in my journey, etc.

    Somewhat filled with your company - The word εμπλησθω, which we translate filled, would be better rendered gratified; for εμπλησθηναι signifies to be satisfied, to be gratified, and to enjoy. Aelian., Hist. Anim., lib. v., c. 21, speaking of the peacock spreading out his beautiful plumage, says: εα γαρ εμπλησθηναι της θεος τον παρεστωτα· "He readily permits the spectator to gratify himself by viewing him." And Maximus Tyrius, Dissert. 41, page 413: "That he may behold the heavens, και εμπλησθη λαμπρου φωτος, and be gratified with the splendor of the light." Homer uses the word in the same sense: -

    Ἡ δ' εμη ουδε περ υἱος ενιπλησθηναι ακοιτις Οφθαλμοισιν εασε

    Odyss., lib. xi., ver. 451.

    "But my wife never suffered my eyes to be delighted with my son."

    The apostle, though he had not the honor of having planted the Church at Rome, yet expected much gratification from the visit which he intended to pay them.

    Barnes' Notes on Romans 15:24

    Whensoever I take my journey into Spain - Ancient Spain comprehended the modern kingdoms of Spain and Portugal, or the whole of the Spanish peninsula. It was then subject to the Romans. It is remarkable, even here, that the apostle does not say that his principal object was to visit the church at Rome, much as he desired that, but only to "take it in his way" in the fulfillment of his higher purpose to preach the gospel in regions where Christ was not named. Whether he ever fulfilled his purpose of visiting "Spain" is a matter of doubt. Some of the fathers, Theodoret (on Philippians 1:25; 2 Timothy 4:17) among others, say that after he was released from his captivity when he was brought before Nero, he passed two years in Spain. If he was imprisoned a "second" time at Rome, such a visit is not improbable as having taken place "between" the two imprisonments. But there is no certain evidence of this. Paul probably projected "many" journeys which were never accomplished.

    To be brought on my way ... - To be assisted by you in regard to this journey; or to be accompanied by you. This was the custom of the churches; Acts 15:3; Acts 17:14-15; Acts 20:38; Acts 21:5; 1 Corinthians 16:6, 1 Corinthians 16:11; 3 John 1:8.

    If first ... - If on my journey, before I go into Spain.

    Somewhat - Greek, "In part." As though he could not be "fully" satisfied with their company, or could not hope to enjoy their society as fully and as long as he could desire. This is a very tender and delicate expression.

    Filled - This is a strong expression, meaning to be "satisfied," to enjoy. To be "filled" with a thing is to have great satisfaction and joy in it.

    With your company - Greek, With "you;" meaning in your society. The expression "to be filled" with one, in the sense of being "gratified," is sometimes used in the classic writers. (See "Clarke" on this verse.)

    Wesley's Notes on Romans 15:24

    15:24 Into Spain - Where the gospel had not yet been preached. If first I may be somewhat satisfied with your company - How remarkable is the modesty with which he speaks! They might rather desire to be satisfied with his. Somewhat satisfied - Intimating the shortness of his stay; or, perhaps, that Christ alone can throughly satisfy the soul.