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Romans 16:22

    Romans 16:22 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I Tertius, who wrote this epistle, salute you in the Lord.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I Tertius, who wrote this letter, salute you in the Lord.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    I Tertius, who write the epistle, salute you in the Lord.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    I, Tertius, who have done the writing of this letter, send love in the Lord.

    Webster's Revision

    I Tertius, who write the epistle, salute you in the Lord.

    World English Bible

    I, Tertius, who write the letter, greet you in the Lord.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    I Tertius, who write the epistle, salute you in the Lord.

    Definitions for Romans 16:22

    Epistle - A Hebrew measurement.

    Clarke's Commentary on Romans 16:22

    I Tertius, who wrote this epistle - Some eminent commentators suppose Tertius to be the same with Silas - the companion of St. Paul. If this were so, it is strange that the name which is generally given him elsewhere in Scripture should not be used in this place. I have already noticed (Preface) that some learned men have supposed that St. Paul wrote this epistle in Syriac, and that Tertius translated it into Greek; but this can never agree with the declaration here: I Tertius, who wrote, γραψας την επιστολην, this epistle; not translated or interpreted it. It appears that St. Paul dictated it to him, and he wrote it down from the apostle's mouth; and here introduces himself as joining with St. Paul in affectionate wishes for their welfare.

    Salute you in the Lord - I wish you well in the name of the Lord: or, I feel for you that affectionate respect which the grace of the Lord Jesus inspires. It is not clear whether the two following verses be the words of Tertius or St. Paul.

    Barnes' Notes on Romans 16:22

    I Tertius - Of Tertius nothing more is known than is mentioned here.

    Who wrote this - It is evident that Paul employed an amanuensis to write this Epistle, and perhaps he commonly did it. Tertius, who thus wrote it, joins with the apostle in affectionate salutations to the brethren at Rome. To the Epistle, Paul signed his own name, and added a salutation in his own hand-writing. Colossians 4:18, "The salutation by the hand of me Paul;" and in 2 Thessalonians 3:17, he says that this was done in every epistle, 1 Corinthians 16:21.

    In the Lord - As Christian brethren.