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Romans 4:15

    Romans 4:15 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Because the law worketh wrath: for where no law is, there is no transgression.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Because the law works wrath: for where no law is, there is no transgression.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    for the law worketh wrath; but where there is no law, neither is there transgression.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For the outcome of the law is wrath; but where there is no law it will not be broken.

    Webster's Revision

    for the law worketh wrath; but where there is no law, neither is there transgression.

    World English Bible

    For the law works wrath, for where there is no law, neither is there disobedience.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    for the law worketh wrath; but where there is no law, neither is there transgression.

    Definitions for Romans 4:15

    Transgression - Wrong-doing; a violation of a law.

    Clarke's Commentary on Romans 4:15

    Because the law worketh wrath - For law νομος, any law, or rule of duty. No law makes provision for the exercise of mercy, for it worketh wrath, οργην, punishment, for the disobedient. Law necessarily subjects the transgressor to punishment; for where no law is - where no rule of duty is enacted and acknowledged, there is no transgression; and where there is no transgression there can be no punishment, for there is no law to enforce it. But the Jews have a law, which they have broken; and now they are exposed to the penal sanctions of that law; and, if the promises of pardon without the works of the law, do not extend to them, they must be finally miserable, because they have all broken the law, and the law exacts punishment. This was a home stroke, and the argument is unanswerable.

    Barnes' Notes on Romans 4:15

    Because the law - All law. It is the tendency of law.

    Worketh wrath - Produces or causes wrath. While man is fallen, and a sinner, its tendency, so far from justifying him, and producing peace, is just the reverse. It condemns, denounces wrath, and produces suffering. The word "wrath" here is to be taken in the sense of punishment. Romans 2:8. And the meaning is, that the Law of God, demanding perfect purity, and denouncing every sin condemns the sinner, and consigns him to punishment. As the apostle had proved Romans 1; 2; 3 that all were sinners, so it followed that if any attempted to be justified by the Law, they would be involved only in condemnation and wrath.

    For where no law is ... - This is a general principle; a maxim of common justice and of common sense. Law is a rule of conduct. If no such rule is given and known, there can be no crime. Law expresses what may be done, and what may not be done. If there is no command to pursue a certain course, no injunction to forbid certain conduct, actions will be innocent. The connection in which this declaration is made here, seems to imply that as the Jews had a multitude of clear laws, and as the Gentiles had the laws of nature, there could be no hope of escape from the charge of their violation. Since human nature was depraved, and people were prone to sin, the more just and reasonable the laws, the less hope was there of being justified by the Law, and the more certainty was there that the Law would produce wrath and condemnation.

    Wesley's Notes on Romans 4:15

    4:15 Because the law - Considered apart from that grace, which though it was in fact mingled with it, yet is no part of the legal dispensation, is so difficult, and we so weak and sinful, that, instead of bringing us a blessing, it only worketh wrath; it becomes to us an occasion of wrath, and exposes us to punishment as transgressors. Where there is no law in force, there can be no transgression of it.