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Romans 6:1

    Romans 6:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    What may we say, then? are we to go on in sin so that there may be more grace?

    Webster's Revision

    What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound?

    World English Bible

    What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound?

    Definitions for Romans 6:1

    Grace - Kindness; favor.

    Clarke's Commentary on Romans 6:1

    Shall we continue in sin - It is very likely that these were the words of a believing Gentile, who - having as yet received but little instruction, for he is but just brought out of his heathen state to believe in Christ Jesus - might imagine, from the manner in which God had magnified his mercy, in blotting out his sin on his simply believing on Christ, that, supposing he even gave way to the evil propensities of his own heart, his transgressions could do him no hurt now that he was in the favor of God. And we need not wonder that a Gentile, just emerging from the deepest darkness, might entertain such thoughts as these; when we find that eighteen centuries after this, persons have appeared in the most Christian countries of Europe, not merely asking such a question, but defending the doctrine with all their might; and asserting in the most unqualified manner, "that believers were under no obligation to keep the moral law of God; that Christ had kept it for them; that his keeping it was imputed to them; and that God, who had exacted it from Him, who was their surety and representative, would not exact it from them, forasmuch as it would be injustice to require two payments for one debt." These are the Antinomians who once flourished in this land, and whose race is not yet utterly extinct.

    Barnes' Notes on Romans 6:1

    What shall we say then? - This is a mode of presenting an objection. The objection refers to what the apostle had said in Romans 5:20. What shall we say to such a sentiment as that where sin abounded grace did much more abound?

    Shall we continue in sin? ... - If sin has been the occasion of grace and favor, ought we not to continue in it, and commit as much as possible, in order that grace might abound? This objection the apostle proceeds to answer. He shows that the consequence does not follow; and proves that the doctrine of justification does not lead to it.

    Wesley's Notes on Romans 6:1

    6:1 The apostle here sets himself more fully to vindicate his doctrine from the consequence above suggested, Rom 3:7,8. He had then only in strong terms denied and renounced it: here he removes the very foundation thereof.