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Romans 6:5

    Romans 6:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For if we have been planted together in the likeness of his death, we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For if we have been planted together in the likeness of his death, we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For if we have become united with him in the likeness of his death, we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For, if we have been made like him in his death, we will, in the same way, be like him in his coming to life again;

    Webster's Revision

    For if we have become united with him in the likeness of his death, we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection;

    World English Bible

    For if we have become united with him in the likeness of his death, we will also be part of his resurrection;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For if we have become united with him by the likeness of his death, we shall be also by the likeness of his resurrection;

    Clarke's Commentary on Romans 6:5

    For if we have been planted together - Συμφυτοι γεγοναμεν. Dr. Taylor observes, that our translation does not completely express the apostle's meaning. Τα συμφυτα are such plants as grow, the one upon and in the other, deriving sap and nourishment from it, as the mistletoe upon the oak, or the scion upon the stock in which it is grafted. He would therefore translate the words: For if we have been growers together with Christ in the likeness of his death, (or in that which is like his death), we shall be also growers together with him in the likeness of his resurrection; or in that which is like his resurrection. He reckons it a beautiful metaphor, taken from grafting, or making the scion grow together with a new stock.

    But if we take the word planted in its usual sense, we shall find it to be a metaphor as beautiful and as expressive as the former. When the seed or plant is inserted in the ground, it derives from that ground all its nourishment, and all those juices by which it becomes developed; by which it increases in size, grows firm, strong, and vigorous; and puts forth its leaves, blossoms, and fruit. The death of Jesus Christ is represented as the cause whence his fruitfulness, as the author of eternal salvation to mankind is derived; and genuine believers in him are represented as being planted in his death, and growing out of it; deriving their growth, vigor, firmness, beauty, and fruitfulness from it. In a word, it is by his death that Jesus Christ redeems a lost world; and it is from that vicarious death that believers derive that pardon and holiness which makes them so happy in themselves, and so useful to others. This sacrificial death is the soil in which they are planted; and from which they derive their life, fruitfulness, and their final glory.

    Barnes' Notes on Romans 6:5

    For if we have been planted together - The word used here σύμφυτος sumphutos, does not occur elsewhere in the New Testament. It properly means sown or planted at the same time; what sprouts or springs up together; and is applied to plants and trees that are planted at the same time, and that sprout and grow together. Thus, the name would be given to a field of grain that was sown at the same time, and where the grain sprung up and grew simultaneously. Hence, it means intimately connected, or joined together. And here it denotes that Christians and the Saviour have been united intimately in regard to death; as he died and was laid in the grave, so have they by profession died to sin. And it is therefore natural to expect, that, like grain sown at the same time, they should grow up in a similar manner, and resemble each other.

    We shall be also - We shall be also fellow-plants; that is, we shall resemble him in regard to the resurrection. As he rose from the grave, so shall we rise from sin. As he lived a new life, being raised up, so shall we live a new life. The propriety of this figure is drawn from the doctrine often referred to in the New Testament, of a union between Christ and his people. See this explained in the notes at John 15:1-10. The sentiment here inferred is but an illustration of what was said by the Saviour John 14:19, "Because I live, ye shall live also." There is perhaps not to be found a more beautiful illustration than that employed here by the apostle of seed sown together in the earth, sprouting together, growing together, and ripening together for the harvest. Thus, the Saviour and his people are united together in his death, start up to life together in his resurrection, and are preparing together for the same harvest of glory in the heavens.

    In the likeness of his resurrection - This does not mean that we shall resemble him when we are raised up at the last day - which may be, however, true - but that our rising from sin will resemble his resurrection from the grave. As he rose from the tomb and lived, so shall we rise from sin and live a new life.

    Wesley's Notes on Romans 6:5

    6:5 For - Surely these two must go together; so that if we are indeed made conformable to his death, we shall also know the power of his resurrection.