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Romans 7:10

    Romans 7:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the commandment, which was ordained to life, I found to be unto death.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the commandment, which was ordained to life, I found to be to death.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    and the commandment, which was unto life, this I found to be unto death:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And I made the discovery that the law whose purpose was to give life had become a cause of death:

    Webster's Revision

    and the commandment, which was unto life, this I found to be unto death:

    World English Bible

    The commandment, which was for life, this I found to be for death;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and the commandment, which was unto life, this I found to be unto death:

    Clarke's Commentary on Romans 7:10

    And the commandment - Meaning the law in general, which was ordained to life; the rule of righteousness teaching those statutes which if a man do he shall live in them, Leviticus 18:5, I found, by transgressing it, to be unto death; for it only presented the duty and laid down the penalty, without affording any strength to resist sin or subdue evil propensities.

    Barnes' Notes on Romans 7:10

    And the commandment - The Law to which he had referred before.

    Which was ordained to life - Which was intended to produce life, or happiness. Life here stands opposed to death, and means felicity, peace, eternal bliss; Note, John 3:36. When the apostle says that it was ordained to life, he probably has reference to the numerous passages in the Old Testament which speak of the Law in this manner, Leviticus 18:5, "Ye shall keep my statutes and my judgments; which if a man do, he shall live in them," Ezekiel 20:11, Ezekiel 20:13, Ezekiel 20:21; Ezekiel 18:9, Ezekiel 18:21. The meaning of these passages, in connection with this declaration of Paul, may be thus expressed:

    (1) The Law is good; it has no evil, and is itself suited to produce no evil.

    (2) if man was pure, and it was obeyed perfectly, it would produce life and happiness only. On those who have obeyed it in heaven, it has produced only happiness.

    (3) for this it was ordained; it is adapted to it; and when perfectly obeyed, it produces no other effect. But,

    (4) Man is a sinner; he has not obeyed it; and in such a case the Law threatens woe.

    It crosses the inclination of man, and instead of producing peace and life, as it would on a being perfectly holy, it produces only woe and crime. The law of a parent may be good, and may be appointed to promote the happiness of his children; it may be admirably suited to it if all were obedient; yet in the family there may be one obstinate, self-willed, and stubborn child, resolved to indulge his evil passions, and the results to him would be woe and despair. The commandment, which was ordained for the good of the family, and which would be adapted to promote their welfare, he alone, of all the number, would find to be unto death.

    I found - It was to me. It produced this effect.

    Unto death - Producing aggravated guilt and condemnation, Romans 7:9.

    Wesley's Notes on Romans 7:10

    7:10 The commandment which was intended for life - Doubtless it was originally intended by God as a grand means of preserving and increasing spiritual life, and leading to life everlasting.