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Romans 7:24

    Romans 7:24 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me out of the body of this death?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    How unhappy am I! who will make me free from the body of this death?

    Webster's Revision

    Wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me out of the body of this death?

    World English Bible

    What a wretched man I am! Who will deliver me out of the body of this death?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me out of the body of this death?

    Clarke's Commentary on Romans 7:24

    O wretched man that I am, etc. - This affecting account is finished more impressively by the groans of the wounded captive. Having long maintained a useless conflict against innumerable hosts and irresistible might, he is at last wounded and taken prisoner; and to render his state more miserable, is not only encompassed by the slaughtered, but chained to a dead body; for there seems to be here an allusion to an ancient custom of certain tyrants, who bound a dead body to a living man, and obliged him to carry it about, till the contagion from the putrid mass took away his life! Virgil paints this in all its horrors, in the account he gives of the tyrant Mezentius. Aeneid, lib. viii. ver. 485.

    Quid memorem infandas caedes? quid facta tyranni?

    Mortua quin etiam jungebat corpora Vivis,

    Componens manibusque manus, atque oribus ora;

    Tormenti genus! et sanie taboque fluentes

    Complexu in misero, longa sic morte necabat.

    What tongue can such barbarities record,

    Or count the slaughters of his ruthless sword?

    'Twas not enough the good, the guiltless bled,

    Still worse, he bound the living to the dead:

    These, limb to limb, and face to face, he joined;

    O! monstrous crime, of unexampled kind!

    Till choked with stench, the lingering wretches lay,

    And, in the loathed embraces, died away!


    Barnes' Notes on Romans 7:24

    O wretched man that I am! - The feeling implied by this lamentation is the result of this painful conflict; and this frequent subjection to sinful propensities. The effect of this conflict is,

    (1) To produce pain and distress. It is often an agonizing struggle between good and evil; a struggle which annoys the peace, and renders life wretched.

    (2) it tends to produce humility. It is humbling to man to be thus under the influence of evil passions. It is degrading to his nature; a stain on his glory; and it tends to bring him into the dust, that he is under the control of such propensities, and so often gives indulgence to them. In such circumstances, the mind is overwhelmed with wretchedness, and instinctively sighs for relief. Can the Law aid? Can man aid? Can any native strength of conscience or of reason aid? In vain all these are tried, and the Christian then calmly and thankfully acquiesces in the consolations of the apostle, that aid can be obtained only through Jesus Christ.

    Who shall deliver me - Who shall rescue me; the condition of a mind in deep distress, and conscious of its own weakness, and looking for aid.

    The body of this death - Margin, "This body of death." The word "body" here is probably used as equivalent to flesh, denoting the corrupt and evil propensities of the soul; Note, Romans 7:18. It is thus used to denote the law of sin in the members, as being that with which the apostle was struggling, and from which he desired to be delivered. The expression "body of this death" is a Hebraism, denoting a body deadly in its tendency; and the whole expression may mean the corrupt principles of man; the carnal, evil affections that lead to death or to condemnation. The expression is one of vast strength, and strongly characteristic of the apostle Paul. It indicates,

    (1) That it was near him, attending him, and was distressing in its nature.

    (2) an earnest wish to be delivered from it.

    Some have supposed that he refers to a custom practiced by ancient tyrants, of binding a dead body to a captive as a punishment, and compelling him to drag the cumbersome and offensive burden with him wherever he went. I do not see any evidence that the apostle had this in view. But such a fact may be used as a striking and perhaps not improper illustration of the meaning of the apostle here. No strength of words could express deeper feeling; none more feelingly indicate the necessity of the grace of God to accomplish that to which the unaided human powers are incompetent.

    Wesley's Notes on Romans 7:24

    7:24 Wretched man that I am - The struggle is now come to the height; and the man, finding there is no help in himself, begins almost unawares to pray, Who shall deliver me? He then seeks and looks for deliverance, till God in Christ appears to answer his question. The word which we translate deliver, implies force. And indeed without this there can be no deliverance. The body of this death - That is, this body of death; this mass of sin, leading to death eternal, and cleaving as close to me as my body to my soul. We may observe, the deliverance is not wrought yet.

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