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Romans 9:1

    Romans 9:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I say the truth in Christ, I lie not, my conscience also bearing me witness in the Holy Ghost,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I say the truth in Christ, I lie not, my conscience also bearing me witness in the Holy Ghost,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    I say the truth in Christ, I lie not, my conscience bearing witness with me in the Holy Spirit,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    I say what is true in Christ, and not what is false, my mind giving witness with me in the Holy Spirit,

    Webster's Revision

    I say the truth in Christ, I lie not, my conscience bearing witness with me in the Holy Spirit,

    World English Bible

    I tell the truth in Christ. I am not lying, my conscience testifying with me in the Holy Spirit,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    I say the truth in Christ, I lie not, my conscience bearing witness with me in the Holy Ghost,

    Clarke's Commentary on Romans 9:1

    I say the truth in Christ, I lie not - This is one of the most solemn oaths any man can possibly take. He appeals to Christ as the searcher of hearts that he tells the truth; asserts that his conscience was free from all guile in this matter, and that the Holy Ghost bore him testimony that what he said was true. Hence we find that the testimony of a man's own conscience, and the testimony of the Holy Ghost, are two distinct things, and that the apostle had both at the same time.

    As the apostle had still remaining a very awful part of his commission to execute, namely, to declare to the Jews not only that God had chosen the Gentiles, but had rejected them because they had rejected Christ and his Gospel, it was necessary that he should assure them that however he had been persecuted by them because he had embraced the Gospel, yet it was so far from being a gratification to him that they had now fallen under the displeasure of God, that it was a subject of continual distress to his mind, and that it produced in him great heaviness and continual sorrow.

    Barnes' Notes on Romans 9:1

    I say the truth - In what I am about to affirm respecting my attachment to the nation and people.

    In Christ - Most interpreters regard this as a form of an oath, as equivalent to calling Christ to witness. It is certainly to be regarded, in its obvious sense, as an appeal to Christ as the searcher of the heart, and as the judge of falsehood. Thus, the word translated "in" ἐν en is used in the form of an oath in Matthew 5:34-36; Revelation 10:6, Greek. We are to remember that the apostle was addressing those who had been Jews; and the expression has all the force of an oath "by the Messiah." This shows that it is right on great and solemn occasions, and in a solemn manner, and thus only, to appeal to Christ for the sincerity of our motives, and for the truth of what we say. And it shows further, that it is right to regard the Lord Jesus Christ as present with us, as searching the heart, as capable of detecting insincerity, hypocrisy, and perjury, and as therefore divine.

    My conscience - Conscience is that act or judgment of the mind by which we decide on the lawfulness or unlawfulness of our actions, and by which we instantly approve or condemn them. It exists in every man, and is a strong witness to our integrity or to our guilt.

    Bearing me witness - Testifying to the truth of what Isay.

    In the Holy Ghost - He does not say that he speaks the truth by or in the Holy Spirit, as he had said of Christ; but that the conscience pronounced its concurring testimony by the Holy Spirit; that is, conscience as enlightened and influenced by the Holy Spirit. It was not simply natural conscience, but it was conscience under the full influence of the Enlightener of the mind and Sanctifier of the heart. The reasons of this solemn asseveration are probably the following:

    (1) His conduct and his doctrines had led some to believe that he was an apostate, and had lost his love for his countrymen. He had forsaken their institutions, and devoted himself to the salvation of the Gentiles. He here shows them that it was from no lack of love to them.

    (2) the doctrines which he was about to state and defend were of a similar character; he was about to maintain that no small part of his own countrymen, notwithstanding their privileges, would be rejected and lost. In this solemn manner, therefore, he assures them that this doctrine had not been embraced because he did not love them, but because it was solemn, though most painful truth. He proceeds to enumerate their privileges as a people, and to show to them the strength and tenderness of his love.

    Wesley's Notes on Romans 9:1

    9:1 In Christ - This seems to imply an appeal to him. In the Holy Ghost - Through his grace.