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Romans 9:10

    Romans 9:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And not only this; but when Rebecca also had conceived by one, even by our father Isaac;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And not only this; but when Rebecca also had conceived by one, even by our father Isaac;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And not only so; but Rebecca also having conceived by one, even by our father Isaac--

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And not only so, but Rebecca being about to have a child by our father Isaac--

    Webster's Revision

    And not only so; but Rebecca also having conceived by one, even by our father Isaac--

    World English Bible

    Not only so, but Rebecca also conceived by one, by our father Isaac.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And not only so; but Rebecca also having conceived by one, even by our father Isaac--

    Clarke's Commentary on Romans 9:10

    And not only this - A Jew might object: "Ishmael was rejected, not by the sovereign will of God, but because he was the son of the handmaid, or bond-woman, and therefore unworthy to be the peculiar seed; but observe, this was not the only limitation of the seed of Abraham with regard to inheriting the promise, for when Rebecca was with child by that one person of Abraham's issue to whom the promise was made, namely, our father Isaac, she went to inquire of the Lord, Genesis 25:22, Genesis 25:23 : And the Lord said unto her, Two nations are in thy womb, and two manner of People shall be separated from thy bowels; and the one People shall be stronger than the other People; and the elder shall serve the younger. That is, the posterity of the younger shall be a nation much more prosperous and happy than the posterity of the elder.

    Barnes' Notes on Romans 9:10

    And not only this - Not only is the principle of making a distinction among the natural descendants of Abraham thus settled by the promise, but it is still further seen and illustrated in the birth of the two sons of Isaac. He had shown that the principle of thus making a distinction among the posterity of Abraham was recognised in the original promise, thus proving that all the descendants of Abraham were not of course to be saved; and he now proceeds to show that the principle was recognised in the case of his posterity in the family of Isaac. And he shows that it is not according to any natural principles that the selection was made; that he not only made a distinction between Jacob and Esau, but that he did it according to his good pleasure, choosing the younger to be the object of his favor, and rejecting the older, who, according to the custom of the times, was supposed to be entitled to special honor and rights. And in order to prove that this was done according to his own pleasure, he shows that the distinction was made before they were born; before they had formed any character; and, consequently, in such a way that it could not be pretended that it was in consequence of any works which they had performed.

    But when Rebecca - The wife of Isaac; see Genesis 25:21, Genesis 25:23.