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Song Of Solomon 1:9

    Song of Solomon 1:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I have compared thee, O my love, to a company of horses in Pharaoh's chariots.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I have compared you, O my love, to a company of horses in Pharaoh's chariots.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    I have compared thee, O my love, To a steed in Pharaoh's chariots.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    I have made a comparison of you, O my love, to a horse in Pharaoh's carriages.

    Webster's Revision

    I have compared thee, O my love, To a steed in Pharaoh's chariots.

    World English Bible

    I have compared you, my love, to a steed in Pharaoh's chariots.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    I have compared thee, O my love, to a steed in Pharaoh's chariots.

    Clarke's Commentary on Song of Solomon 1:9

    I have compared thee - to a company of horses - This may be translated, more literally, "I have compared thee, to my mare, in the chariots or courses of Pharaoh;" and so the versions understood it. Mares, in preference to horses, were used both for riding and for chariots in the East. They are much swifter, endure more hardship. and will go longer without food, than either the stallion or the gelding.

    There is perhaps no brute creature in the world so beautiful as a fine well-bred horse or mare; and the finest woman in the universe, Helen, has been compared to a horse in a Thessalian chariot, by Theocritus. Idyl. 18: ver. 28: -

    Ὡδε και ἁ χρυσεα Ἑλενα διαφαινετ' εν ἡμιν,

    Πιειρη, μεγαλη, ἁτ' ανεδραμεν ογμος αρουρᾳ,

    Η καπῳ κυπαρισσος, η ἁρματι Θεσσαλος ἱππος.

    "The golden Helen, tall and graceful, appears as distinguished among us as the furrow in the field, the cypress in the garden, or the Thessalian horse in the chariot."

    This passage amply justifies the Hebrew bard, in the simile before us. See Jeremiah 6:2.

    Barnes' Notes on Song of Solomon 1:9

    This and the next Cant. 1:15-2:7 sections are regarded by ancient commentators (Jewish and Christian) as expressing "the love of espousals" Jeremiah 2:2 between the Holy One and His Church, first in the wilderness of the Exodus, and then in the wilderness of the world Ezekiel 20:35-36.

    Songs 1:9

    Or, to a mare of mine in the chariots of Pharaoh I liken thee, O my friend. (The last word is the feminine form of that rendered "friend" at Sol 5:16.) The comparison of the bride to a beautiful horse is singularly like one in Theocritus, and some have conjectured that the Greek poet, having read at Alexandria the Septuagint Version of the Song, may have borrowed these thoughts from it. If so, we have here the first instance of an influence of sacred on profane literature. The simile is especially appropriate on the lips, or from the pen, of Solomon, who first brought horses and chariots from Egypt 1 Kings 10:28-29. As applied to the bride it expresses the stately and imposing character of her beauty.

    Wesley's Notes on Song of Solomon 1:9

    1:9 Compared thee - For strength and courage, to overcome all thine enemies. For horses are famous for that property, and the strength of the battle was then thought to consist much in horses, and chariots, especially in a company or multitude of them. And the church in this book is represented not only as fair and beautiful, but also as terrible to her enemies.