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Song Of Solomon 2:8

    Song of Solomon 2:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The voice of my beloved! behold, he cometh leaping upon the mountains, skipping upon the hills.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The voice of my beloved! behold, he comes leaping on the mountains, skipping on the hills.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    The voice of my beloved! behold, he cometh, Leaping upon the mountains, Skipping upon the hills.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The voice of my loved one! See, he comes dancing on the mountains, stepping quickly on the hills.

    Webster's Revision

    The voice of my beloved! behold, he cometh, Leaping upon the mountains, Skipping upon the hills.

    World English Bible

    The voice of my beloved! Behold, he comes, leaping on the mountains, skipping on the hills.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The voice of my beloved! behold, he cometh, leaping upon the mountains, skipping upon the hills.

    Clarke's Commentary on Song of Solomon 2:8

    Behold, he cometh leaping - This appears to be highly characteristic of the gambols of the shepherds, and points out the ecstasy with which those who were enamoured ran to their mates. It is supposed that the second day's eclogue begins at this verse. The author of what was then called A New Translation of Solomon's Song, observes,

    1. The bride relates how the bridegroom, attended by his companions, had come under her window, and called upon her to come forth and enjoy the beauties of the spring, Sol 2:9-11, etc.

    2. She then returns to her narration, Sol 3:1. The bridegroom did not come according to her wishes. Night came on; she did not find him in her bed; she went out to seek him; found him, and brought him to her mother's pavilion, Sol 3:4; and then, as before, conjures the virgins not to disturb his repose, Sol 3:5.

    Barnes' Notes on Song of Solomon 2:8

    The bride relates to the chorus a visit which the beloved had paid her some time previously in her native home. He on a fair spring morning solicits her company. The bride, immersed in rustic toils, refuses for the present, but confessing her love, bids him return at the cool of day. It is a spring-time of affection which is here described, still earlier than that of the former chapter, a day of pure first-love, in which, on either side, all royal state and circumstance is forgotten or concealed. Hence, perhaps, the annual recitation of the Song of Songs by the synagogue with each return of spring, at the Feast of Passover, and special interpretations of this passage by Hebrew doctors, as referring to the paschal call of Israel out of Egypt, and by Christian fathers, as foreshadowing the evangelic mysteries of Easter - Resurrection and Regeneration. The whole scene has also been thought to represent the communion of a newly-awakened soul with Christ, lie gradually revealing Himself to her, and bidding her come forth into fuller communion.

    Songs 2:8

    Voice - Better, "sound." Not a voice, but the sound of approaching footsteps is meant (compare "noise," Isaiah 13:4).