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Song Of Solomon 3:9

    Song of Solomon 3:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    King Solomon made himself a chariot of the wood of Lebanon.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    King Solomon made himself a chariot of the wood of Lebanon.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    King Solomon made himself a palanquin Of the wood of Lebanon.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    King Solomon made himself a bed of the wood of Lebanon.

    Webster's Revision

    King Solomon made himself a palanquin Of the wood of Lebanon.

    World English Bible

    King Solomon made himself a carriage of the wood of Lebanon.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    King Solomon made himself a palanquin of the wood of Lebanon.

    Clarke's Commentary on Song of Solomon 3:9

    Of the wood of Lebanon - Of the cedar that grew on that mount. It is very likely that a nuptial bed, not a chariot, is intended by the original word אפיון appiryon. Montanus properly translates it sponsarum thalamum, a nuptial bed. It may, however, mean a palanquin.

    Barnes' Notes on Song of Solomon 3:9

    A stately bed hath king Solomon made for himself of woods (or trees) of the Lebanon. The word rendered "bed" occurs nowhere else in Scripture, and is of doubtful etymology and meaning. It may denote here

    (1) the bride's car or litter; or

    (2) a more magnificent vehicle provided for her reception on her entrance into the city, and in which perhaps the king goes forth to meet her.

    It has been made under Solomon's own directions of the costliest woods (ceda and pine) of the Lebanon; it is furnished with "pillars of silver" supporting a "baldachin" or "canopy of gold" (not "bottom" as in the King James Version), and with "a seat (not 'covering') of purple cushions," while "its interior is paved with (mosaic work, or tapestry of) love from (not 'for') the daughters of Jerusalem;" the meaning being that this part of the adornment is a gift of love, whereby the female chorus have testified their goodwill to the bride, and their desire to gratify the king.

    Wesley's Notes on Song of Solomon 3:9

    3:9 A chariot - In which the royal bridegroom and bride might ride together in state. By this chariot he seems to understand the word of Christ dispensed by his ministers, whereby Christ rides triumphantly in the world, and believers are carried into heavenly glory. Of Lebanon - Of cedars, which wood being incorruptible, doth fitly signify the word of the gospel, which endureth forever, 1Pet 1:25.