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Song Of Solomon 4:7

    Song of Solomon 4:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Thou art all fair, my love; there is no spot in thee.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    You are all fair, my love; there is no spot in you.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Thou art all fair, my love; And there is no spot in thee.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    You are all fair, my love; there is no mark on you.

    Webster's Revision

    Thou art all fair, my love; And there is no spot in thee.

    World English Bible

    You are all beautiful, my love. There is no spot in you.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Thou art all fair, my love; and there is no spot in thee.

    Definitions for Song of Solomon 4:7

    Art - "Are"; second person singular.

    Clarke's Commentary on Song of Solomon 4:7

    Thou art all fair - there is no spot in thee - "My beloved, every part of thee is beautiful; thou hast not a single defect." The description given of the beauties of Daphne, by Ovid, Metam. lib. 1: ver. 497, has some similarity to the above verses: -

    Spectat inornatos collo pend ere capillos.

    Et, quid si comantur? ait. Videt igne micantes

    Sideribus similes oculos; videt oscula, quae non

    Est vidisse satis. Laudat digitosque, manusque,

    Brachiaque, et nudos media plus parte lacertos.

    Si qua latent meliora putat.

    Her well-turn'd neck he view'd, (her neck was bare),

    And on her shoulders her disheveled hair.

    O, were it comb'd, said he, with what a grace

    Would every waving curl become her face!

    He view'd her eyes, like heavenly lamps that shone,

    He view'd her lips, too sweet to view alone;

    Her taper fingers, and her panting breast.

    continued...

    Barnes' Notes on Song of Solomon 4:7

    Section Songs 4:7-5:1: The king meeting the bride in the evening of the same day, expresses once more his love and admiration in the sweetest and tenderest terms and figures. He calls her now "bride" (spouse, Sol 4:8) for the first time, to mark it as the hour of their espousals, and "sister-bride" (spouse, Sol 4:9-10, Sol 4:12; Sol 5:1), to express the likeness of thought and disposition which henceforth unites them. At the same time he invites her to leave for his sake her birthplace and its mountain neighborhood, and live henceforth for him alone.