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Song Of Solomon 4:8

    Song of Solomon 4:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Come with me from Lebanon, my spouse, with me from Lebanon: look from the top of Amana, from the top of Shenir and Hermon, from the lions' dens, from the mountains of the leopards.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Come with me from Lebanon, my spouse, with me from Lebanon: look from the top of Amana, from the top of Shenir and Hermon, from the lions' dens, from the mountains of the leopards.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Come with me from Lebanon, my bride, With me from Lebanon: Look from the top of Amana, From the top of Senir and Hermon, From the lions dens, From the mountains of the leopards.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Come with me from Lebanon, my bride, with me from Lebanon; see from the top of Amana, from the top of Senir and Hermon, from the places of the lions, from the mountains of the leopards.

    Webster's Revision

    Come with me from Lebanon, my bride, With me from Lebanon: Look from the top of Amana, From the top of Senir and Hermon, From the lions dens, From the mountains of the leopards.

    World English Bible

    Come with me from Lebanon, my bride, with me from Lebanon. Look from the top of Amana, from the top of Senir and Hermon, from the lions' dens, from the mountains of the leopards.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Come with me from Lebanon, my bride, with me from Lebanon: look from the top of Amana, from the top of Senir and Hermon, from the lions' dens, from the mountains of the leopards.

    Clarke's Commentary on Song of Solomon 4:8

    My spouse - The כלה callah which we translate spouse, seems to have a peculiar meaning. Mr. Harmer thinks the Jewish princess is intended by it; and this seems to receive confirmation from the bridegroom calling her sister, Sol 4:9, that is, one of the same stock and country; and thus different from the Egyptian bride.

    Mr. Harmer's opinion is very probable, that Two Queens are mentioned in this song: one Pharaoh's daughter, the other a Jewess. See his outlines. But I contend for no system relative to this song.

    Look from the top of Amana, etc. - Solomon, says Calmet, by an admirable poetic fiction, represents his beloved as a mountain nymph, wholly occupied in hunting the lion and the leopard on the mountains of Lebanon, Amana, Shenir, and Hermon. As a bold and undisciplined virgin, who is unwilling to leave her wild and rural retreats, he invites her to come from those hills; and promises to deck her with a crown and to make her his bride. Thus the poets represent their goddess Diana, and even Venus herself: -

    Per juga, per sylvas, dumosaque saxa vagatur

    Nuda genu, vestem ritu succincta Dianae;

    Hortaturque canes; tutaeque animalia praedae,

    Aut pronos lepores, aut celsum in cornua cervum,

    Aut agitat damas: at fortibus abstinet apris.

    MET. lib. x., ver. 535.

    Now buskin'd like the virgin huntress goes

    Through woods, and pathless wilds, and mountain snows.

    With her own tuneful voice she joys to cheer

    The panting hounds that chase the flying deer.

    She runs the labyrinth of the fearful hares,

    continued...

    Barnes' Notes on Song of Solomon 4:8

    The order and collocation of words in the Hebrew is grand and significant. With me from Lebanon, O bride, with me from Lebanon thou shalt come, shalt look around (or wander forth) from the height (literally "head") of Amana, from the height of Shenir and Hermon, from dens of lions, from mountain-haunts of leopards. It is evidently a solemn invitation from the king in the sense of Psalm 45:10-11. Four peaks in the same mountain-system are here named as a poetical periphrasis for northern Palestine, the region in which is situated the native home of the bride.

    (1) Amana (or Abana, 2 Kings 5:12), that part of the Anti-libanus which overlooks Damascus.

    (2) Shenir or Senir, another peak of the same range (according to Deuteronomy 3:9, the Amorite name for Hermon, but spoken of here and in 1 Chronicles 5:23 as distinct from it).

    (3) Hermon, the celebrated mountain which forms the culminating point of the Anti-libanus, on the northeastern border of the holy land.

    (4) Lebanon, properly the western range overlooking the Mediterranean, but here used as a common designation for the whole mountain system.

    Leopards are still not unfrequently seen there, but the lion has long since disappeared.

    Wesley's Notes on Song of Solomon 4:8

    4:8 Come - Unto the mountains of myrrh. Look - To the place to which I invite thee to go, which from those high mountains thou mayest easily behold. Of Leopards - From these or other mountains, which are inhabited by lions and leopards. This seems to be added as an argument to move the spouse to go with him, because the places where now she was, were not only barren, but also dangerous.