Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Titus 2:10

    Titus 2:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Not purloining, but shewing all good fidelity; that they may adorn the doctrine of God our Saviour in all things.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Not purloining, but showing all good fidelity; that they may adorn the doctrine of God our Savior in all things.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    not purloining, but showing all good fidelity; that they may adorn the doctrine of God our Saviour in all things.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Not taking what is not theirs, but giving clear signs of their good faith, in all things doing credit to the teaching of God our Saviour.

    Webster's Revision

    not purloining, but showing all good fidelity; that they may adorn the doctrine of God our Saviour in all things.

    World English Bible

    not stealing, but showing all good fidelity; that they may adorn the doctrine of God, our Savior, in all things.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    not purloining, but shewing all good fidelity; that they may adorn the doctrine of God our Saviour in all things.

    Definitions for Titus 2:10

    Doctrine - The act or result of teaching.
    Purloining - Stealing; pilfering.

    Clarke's Commentary on Titus 2:10

    Not purloining - Μη νοσφιζομενους· Neither giving away, privately selling, nor in any way wasting, the master's goods. The word signifies, not only stealing but embezzling another's property; keeping back a part of the price of any commodity sold on the master's account. In Acts 5:2, we translate it, to keep back part of the price; the crime of which Ananias and Sapphira were guilty. It has been remarked that among the heathens this species of fraud was very frequent; and servants were so noted for purloining and embezzling their master's property that fur, which signifies a thief, was commonly used to signify a servant; hence that verse in Virgil, Eclog. iii.:16: -

    Quid domini faciant, audent cum talia Fures?

    "What may not masters do, when servants (thieves) are so bold?"

    On which Servius remarks: Pro Servo Furem posuit, furta enim specialiter servorum sunt. Sic Plautus de servo, Homo es trium literarum, i.e. fur. "He puts fur, a thief, to signify a servant, because servants are commonly thieves. Thus Plautus, speaking of a servant, says: Thou art a man of three letters, i.e. f-u-r, a thief." And Terence denominates a number of servants, munipulus furum, "a bundle of thieves." Eun. 4, 7, 6. The place in Plautus to which Servius refers is in Aulul., act ii. scene iv. in fine: -

    - Tun', trium literarum homo,

    Me vituperas? F-u-r, etiam fur trifurcifer.

    "Dost thou blame me, thou man of three letters?

    Thou art a thief, and the most notorious of all knaves."

    It was necessary, therefore, that the apostle should be so very particular in his directions to servants, as they were in general thieves almost by profession.

    Barnes' Notes on Titus 2:10

    Not purloining - Not to appropriate to themselves what belongs to their masters. The word "purloin" means, literally, to take or carry away for oneself; and would be applied to an approbation to oneself of what pertained to a common stock, or what belonged to one in whose employ we are - as the embezzlement of public funds. Here it means that the servant was not to apply to his own use what belonged to his master; that is, was not to pilfer - a vice to which, as all know, servants, and especially slaves, are particularly exposed; see the word explained in the notes at Acts 5:2.

    But showing all good fidelity - In laboring, and in taking care of the property intrusted to them.

    That they may adorn the doctrine of God our Saviour in all things - That they may show the fair influence of religion on them, in all respects, making them industrious, honest, kind, and obedient. They were to show that the effect of the religion which they professed was to make them better fitted to discharge the duties of their station in life, however humble; or that its influence on them was desirable in every respect. In this way, they might hope also that the minds of their masters might be reached, and that they might be brought to respect and love the gospel. Hence, learn:

    (1) that one in the most humble walk of life may so live as to be an ornament to religion, as well as one favored with more advantages.

    (2) that servants may do much good, by so living as to show to all around them that there is a reality in the gospel, and to lead others to love it.

    (3) if in this situation of life, it is a duty so to live as to adorn religion, it cannot be less so in more elevated situations. A master should feel the obligation not to be surpassed in religious character by his servant.

    Wesley's Notes on Titus 2:10

    2:10 Showing all good fidelity - Soft, obliging faithfulness That they may adorn the doctrine of God our Saviour - More than St. Paul says of kings. How he raises the lowness of his subject! So may they, the lowness of their condition.