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Titus 2:12

    Titus 2:12 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    instructing us, to the intent that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly and righteously and godly in this present world;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Training us so that, turning away from evil and the desires of this world, we may be living wisely and uprightly in the knowledge of God in this present life;

    Webster's Revision

    instructing us, to the intent that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly and righteously and godly in this present world;

    World English Bible

    instructing us to the intent that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we would live soberly, righteously, and godly in this present world;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    instructing us, to the intent that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly and righteously and godly in this present world;

    Clarke's Commentary on Titus 2:12

    Teaching us, that, denying, etc. - Παιδευουσα· Instructing us as children are instructed. Christ is the great teacher; and men, in order to learn, must become his disciples - must put themselves under his tuition, and learn of him.

    Denying ungodliness - Ασεβειαν· All things contrary to God; whatever would lead us to doubt his being, deny any of his essential attributes; his providence or government of the world, and his influence on the souls of men. Every thing, also, which is opposed to his true worship; theoretical and practical atheism, deism, and irreligion in general.

    Worldly lusts - Such desires, affections, and appetites, as men are governed by who have their portion in this life, and live without God in the world. Gluttony, drunkenness, lasciviousness, anger, malice, and revenge; together with the immoderate love of riches, power, and fame.

    We should live soberly - Having every temper, appetite, and desire, under the government of reason, and reason itself under the government of the Spirit of God.

    Righteously - Rendering to every man his due, injuring no person in his body, mind, reputation, or property; doing unto all as we would they should do to us; and filling up the duties of the particular stations in which it has pleased God to fix us, committing no sin, omitting no duty.

    And godly - Ευσεβως. Just the reverse of what is implied in ungodliness. See above.

    In this present world - Not supposing that any thing will be purified in the world to come that is not cleansed in this. The three words above evidently include our duty to God, to our neighbor, and to ourselves.

    1. We are to live soberly in respect to ourselves.

    2. Righteously in respect to our neighbor. And

    3. Godly, or piously, in respect to our Maker.

    Barnes' Notes on Titus 2:12

    Teaching us - That is, the "grace of God" so teaches us; or that system of religion which is a manifestation of the grace of God, inculcates the great and important duties which Paul proceeds to state.

    That denying ungodliness and worldly lusts - "That by denying ourselves of these, or refusing to practice them, we should lead a holy life." The word ungodliness here means all that would be included under the word impiety; that is, all failure in the performance of our proper duties towards God; see the notes at Romans 1:18. The phrase "worldly lusts" refers to all improper desires pertaining to this life - the desire of wealth, pleasure, honor, sensual indulgence. It refers to such passions as the people of this world are prone to, and would include all those things which cannot be indulged in with a proper reference to the world to come. The gross passions would be of course included, and all those more refined pleasures also which constitute the characteristic and special enjoyments of those who do not live unto God.

    We should live soberly - See the word "soberly" (σωφρόνως sōphronōs) explained in the notes at Titus 2:2, Titus 2:4. It means that we should exercise a due restraint on our passions and propensities.

    Righteously - Justly - δικαίως dikaiōs. This refers to the proper performance of our duties to our fellow-men; and it means that religion teaches us to perform those duties with fidelity, according to all our relations in life; to all our promises and contracts; to our fellow-citizens and neighbors; to the poor, and needy, and ignorant, and oppressed; and to all those who are providentially placed in our way who need our kind offices. Justice to them would lead us to act as we would wish that they would towards us.

    And godly - Piously; that is, in the faithful performance of our duties to God. We have here, then, an epitome of all that religion requires:

    (1) our duty to ourselves - included in the word "soberly" and requiring a suitable control over our evil propensities and passions;

    (2) our duty to our fellow-men in all the relations we sustain in life; and,

    (3) our duty to God - evinced in what will be properly regarded as a pious life.

    He that does these things, meets all the responsibilites of his condition and relations; and the Christian system, requiring the faithful performance of these duties, shows how admirably it is adapted to man.

    In this present world - That is, as long as we shall continue in it. These are the duties which we owe in the present life.

    Wesley's Notes on Titus 2:12

    2:12 Instructing us - All who do not reject it. That, having renounced ungodliness - Whatever is contrary to the fear and love of God. And worldly desires - Which are opposite to sobriety and righteousness. We should live soberly - In all purity and holiness. Sobriety, in the scripture sense, is rather the whole temper of a man, than a single virtue in him. It comprehends all that is opposite to the drowsiness of sin, the folly of ignorance, the unholiness of disorderly passions. Sobriety is no less than all the powers of the soul being consistently and constantly awake, duly governed by heavenly prudence, and entirely conformable to holy affections. And righteously - Doing to all as we would they should do to us. And godly - As those who are consecrated to God both in heart and life.