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Titus 2:14

    Titus 2:14 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify to himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a people for his own possession, zealous of good works.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Who gave himself for us, so that he might make us free from all wrongdoing, and make for himself a people clean in heart and on fire with good works.

    Webster's Revision

    who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a people for his own possession, zealous of good works.

    World English Bible

    who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify for himself a people for his own possession, zealous for good works.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a people for his own possession, zealous of good works.

    Definitions for Titus 2:14

    Iniquity - Sin; wickedness; evil.

    Clarke's Commentary on Titus 2:14

    Who gave himself for us - Who gave his own life as a ransom price to redeem ours. This is evidently what is meant, as the words λυτρωσηται and λαον περιουσιον imply. The verb λυτροω signifies to redeem or ransom by paying a price, as I have often had occasion to observe; and περιουσιος signifies such a peculiar property as a man has in what he has purchased with his own money. Jesus gave his life for the world, and thus has purchased men unto himself; and, having purchased the slaves from their thraldom, he is represented as stripping them of their sordid vestments, cleansing and purifying them unto himself that they may become his own servants, and bringing them out of their dishonorable and oppressive servitude, in which they had no proper motive to diligence and could have no affection for the despot under whose authority they were employed. Thus redeemed, they now become his willing servants, and are zealous of good works - affectionately attached to that noble employment which is assigned to them by that Master whom it is an inexpressible honor to serve. This seems to be the allusion in the above verse.

    Barnes' Notes on Titus 2:14

    Who gave himself for us - See the notes at Ephesians 5:2.

    That he might redeem us from all iniquity - The word here rendered "redeem" - λυτρόω lutroō, occurs only here and in Luke 24:21; 1 Peter 1:18. The noun, however - λύτρον lutron, occurs in Matthew 20:28; and Mark 10:45; where it is rendered "ransom;" see it explained in the notes at Matthew 20:28. It is here said that the object of his giving himself was to save his people from all iniquity; see this explained in the notes at Matthew 1:21.

    And purify unto himself -

    (1) Purify them, or make them holy. This is the first and leading object; see the notes at Hebrews 9:14

    (2) "Unto himself;" that is, they are no longer to be regarded as their own, but as redeemed for his own service, and for the promotion of his glory; - Notes, 1 Corinthians 6:19-20.

    A peculiar people - 1 Peter 2:9. The word here used (περιούσιος periousios) occurs nowhere else in the New Testament. It means, properly, having abundance; and then one's own, what is special, or peculiar (Robinson, Lexicon), and here means that they were to be regarded as belonging to the Lord Jesus. It does not mean, as the word would seem to imply - and as is undoubtedly true - that they are to be a unique people in the sense that they are to be unlike others, or to have views and principles unique to themselves; but that they belong to the Saviour in contradistinction from belonging to themselves - "peculiar" or his own in the sense that a man's property is his own, and does not belong to others. This passage, therefore, should not be used to prove that Christians should be unlike others in their manner of living, but that they belong to Christ as his redeemed people. From that it may indeed be inferred that they should be unlike others, but that is not the direct teaching of the passage.

    Zealous of good works - As the result of their redemption; that is, this is one object of their having been redeemed; Notes, Ephesians 2:10.

    Wesley's Notes on Titus 2:14

    2:14 Who gave himself for us - To die in our stead. That he might redeem us - Miserable bondslaves, as well from the power and the very being, as from the guilt, of all our sins.