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Titus 3:2

    Titus 3:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    To speak evil of no man, to be no brawlers, but gentle, shewing all meekness unto all men.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    To speak evil of no man, to be no brawlers, but gentle, showing all meekness to all men.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    to speak evil of no man, not to be contentious, to be gentle, showing all meekness toward all men.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    To say no evil of any man, not to be fighters, to give way to others, to be gentle in behaviour to all men.

    Webster's Revision

    to speak evil of no man, not to be contentious, to be gentle, showing all meekness toward all men.

    World English Bible

    to speak evil of no one, not to be contentious, to be gentle, showing all humility toward all men.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    to speak evil of no man, not to be contentious, to be gentle, shewing all meekness toward all men.

    Clarke's Commentary on Titus 3:2

    To speak evil of no man - Μηδενα βλασφημειν· To blaspheme no person, to reproach none, to speak nothing to any man's injury; but, on the contrary, bearing reproach and contumely with patience and meekness.

    Barnes' Notes on Titus 3:2

    To speak evil of no man - Greek, "to blaspheme (βλασφημεῖν blasphēmein, compare the notes at Matthew 9:3) no one." Doddridge renders it, "calumniate no one." The idea is, that we are not to slander, revile, or defame anyone. We are not to say anything to anyone, or of anyone, which will do him injury. We are never to utter anything which we know to be false about him or to give such a coloring to his words or conduct as to do him wrong in any way. We should always so speak to him and of him in such a way that he will have no reason to complain that he is an injured man. It may be necessary, when we are called to state what we know of his character, to say things which are not at all in his favor, or things which he has said or done that were wrong; but,

    (1) we should never do this for the purpose of doing him injury, or so as to find a pleasure in it; and,

    (2) where it is necessary to make the statement, it should be so as to do him no injustice.

    We should give no improper coloring. We should exaggerate no circumstances. We should never attempt to express ourselves about his motives, or charge on him bad motives - for we know not what his motives were. We should state every palliating circumstance of which we have knowledge, and do entire justice to it. We should not make the bad traits of his character prominent, and pass over all that is good. In a word, we should show that we would rather find him to be a good man than a bad man - even if the result should be that we had been mistaken in our opinions. It is better that we should have been mistaken, than that he should be a bad man.

    To be no brawlers - See the notes at 1 Timothy 3:3. The same Greek word occurs in both places. It is not elsewhere found in the New Testament.

    But gentle - The word here used is rendered "moderation" in Philippians 4:5, "patient" in 1 Timothy 3:3, and elsewhere "gentle;" see the notes at 1 Timothy 3:3.

    Showing all meekness unto all men - In the reception of injuries; see the Matthew 5:5 note; Ephesians 4:2 note.

    Wesley's Notes on Titus 3:2

    3:2 To speak evil - Neither of them nor any man. Not to be quarrelsome - To assault none. To be gentle - When assaulted. Toward all men - Even those who are such as we were.