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1 Corinthians 14:30

    1 Corinthians 14:30 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    If any thing be revealed to another that sitteth by, let the first hold his peace.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    If any thing be revealed to another that sits by, let the first hold his peace.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But if a revelation be made to another sitting by, let the first keep silence.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But if a revelation is given to another who is seated near, let the first be quiet.

    Webster's Revision

    But if a revelation be made to another sitting by, let the first keep silence.

    World English Bible

    But if a revelation is made to another sitting by, let the first keep silent.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But if a revelation be made to another sitting by, let the first keep silence.

    Definitions for 1 Corinthians 14:30

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 14:30

    Be revealed to another that sitteth by - Probably those who were teachers sat on a particular seat, or place, from which they might most readily address the people; and this may be the meaning of sitting by. If such a person could say, I have just received a particular revelation from God, then let him have the liberty immediately to speak it; as it might possibly relate to the circumstances of that time and place.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 14:30

    If anything be revealed to another - If, while one is speaking, an important truth is revealed to another, or is suggested to his mind by the Holy Spirit, which he feels it to be important to communicate.

    Let the first hold his peace - That is, let him that was speaking conclude his discourse, and let there not be the confusion arising from two persons speaking. at the same time. Doddridge understands this as meaning, that he to whom the revelation was made should sit still, until the other was done speaking, and not rise and rudely interrupt him. But this is to do violence to the language. So Macknight understands it, that the one who was speaking was first to finish his discourse, and be silent. before the other began to speak. But this is evidently a forced construction. Locke understands it as meaning, that if, while one was speaking, the meaning of what he said was revealed to another, the first was to cease speaking until the other had interpreted or explained it. But the obvious meaning of the passage is, that the man that was speaking was to close his discourse and be silent. It does not follow, however, that he was to be rudely interrupted. He might close his discourse deliberately, or perhaps by an intimation from the person to whom the revelation was made. At any rate, two were not to speak at the same time, but the one who was speaking was to conclude before the other addressed the assembly.