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1 Corinthians 14:33

    1 Corinthians 14:33 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For God is not the author of confusion, but of peace, as in all churches of the saints.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For God is not the author of confusion, but of peace, as in all churches of the saints.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    for God is not a God of confusion, but of peace. As in all the churches of the saints,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For God is not a God whose ways are without order, but a God of peace; as in all the churches of the saints.

    Webster's Revision

    for God is not a God of confusion, but of peace. As in all the churches of the saints,

    World English Bible

    for God is not a God of confusion, but of peace. As in all the assemblies of the saints,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    for God is not a God of confusion, but of peace; as in all the churches of the saints.

    Definitions for 1 Corinthians 14:33

    Saints - Men and women of God.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 14:33

    For God is not the author of confusion - Let not the persons who act in the congregation in this disorderly manner, say, that they are under the influence of God; for he is not the author of confusion; but two, three, or more, praying or teaching in the same place, at the same time, is confusion; and God is not the author of such work; and let men beware how they attribute such disorder to the God of order and peace. The apostle calls such conduct ακαταστασια, tumult, sedition; and such it is in the sight of God, and in the sight of all good men. How often is a work of God marred and discredited by the folly of men! for nature will always, and Satan too, mingle themselves as far as they can in the genuine work of the Spirit, in order to discredit and destroy it. Nevertheless, in great revivals of religion it is almost impossible to prevent wild - fire from getting in amongst the true fire; but it is the duty of the ministers of God to watch against and prudently check this; but if themselves encourage it, then there will be confusion and every evil work.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 14:33

    God is not the author of confusion - Margin, "Tumult," or "unquietness." His religion cannot tend to produce disorder. He is the God of peace; and his religion will tend to promote order. It is calm, peaceful, thoughtful. It is not boisterous and disorderly.

    As in all churches of the saints - As was everywhere apparent in the churches. Paul here appeals to them, and says that this was the fact wherever the true religion was spread, that it tended to produce peace and order. This is as true now as it was then. And we may learn, therefore:

    (1) That where there is disorder, there is little religion. Religion does not produce it; and the tendency of tumult and confusion is to drive religion away.

    (2) true religion will not lead to tumult, to outcries, or to irregularity. It will not prompt many to speak or pray at once; nor will it justify tumultuous and noisy assemblages.

    (3) Christians should regard God as the author of peace. They should always in the sanctuary demean themselves in a reverent manner, and with such decorum as becomes people when they are in the presence of a holy and pure God, and engaged in his worship.

    (4) all those pretended conversions, however sudden and striking they may be, which are attended with disorder, and confusion, and public outcries, are to be suspected. Such excitement may be connected with genuine piety, but it is no part of pure religion. That is calm, serious, orderly, heavenly. No person who is under its influence is disposed to engage in scenes of confusion and disorder. Grateful he may be, and he may and will express his gratitude; prayerful he will be, and he will pray; anxious for others he will be, and he will express that anxiety; but it will be with seriousness, tenderness, love; with a desire for the order of God's house, and not with a desire to break in upon and disturb all the solemnities of public worship.