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1 Corinthians 14:6

    1 Corinthians 14:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Now, brethren, if I come unto you speaking with tongues, what shall I profit you, except I shall speak to you either by revelation, or by knowledge, or by prophesying, or by doctrine?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Now, brothers, if I come to you speaking with tongues, what shall I profit you, except I shall speak to you either by revelation, or by knowledge, or by prophesying, or by doctrine?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But now, brethren, if I come unto you speaking with tongues, what shall I profit you, unless I speak to you either by way of revelation, or of knowledge, or of prophesying, or of teaching?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But, now, my brothers, if I come to you using tongues, what profit will it be to you, if I do not give you a revelation, or knowledge, or the word of the prophet, or teaching?

    Webster's Revision

    But now, brethren, if I come unto you speaking with tongues, what shall I profit you, unless I speak to you either by way of revelation, or of knowledge, or of prophesying, or of teaching?

    World English Bible

    But now, brothers, if I come to you speaking with other languages, what would I profit you, unless I speak to you either by way of revelation, or of knowledge, or of prophesying, or of teaching?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But now, brethren, if I come unto you speaking with tongues, what shall I profit you, unless I speak to you either by way of revelation, or of knowledge, or of prophesying, or of teaching?

    Definitions for 1 Corinthians 14:6

    Doctrine - The act or result of teaching.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 14:6

    Speaking with tongues - Without interpreting.

    What shall I profit you? - i.e. I shall not profit you;

    Except I shall speak to you either by revelation - Of some secret thing; or by knowledge, of some mystery; or by prophesying, foretelling some future event; or by doctrine, instructing you what to believe and practice. - See Whitby. These four words are taken in different acceptations by learned men. The general sense of the terms is that given above: but the peculiar meaning of the apostle is perhaps not easily discerned.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 14:6

    Now, brethren, if I come unto you ... - The truth which the apostle had been illustrating in an abstract manner, he proceeds to illustrate by applying it to himself. If he should come among them speaking foreign languages, it could be of no use unless it were interpreted to them.

    Speaking with tongues - Speaking foreign languages; that is, speaking them "only," without any interpreter. Paul had the power of speaking foreign languages 1 Corinthians 14:18; but he did not use this power for ostentation or display, but merely to communicate the gospel to those who did not understand his native tongue.

    Either by revelation - Macknight renders this, "speak intelligibly;" that is, as he explains it, "by the revelation peculiar to an apostle." Doddridge, "by the revelation of some gospel doctrine and mystery." Locke interprets it, that you might understand the revelation, or knowledge," etc.; but says in a note, that we cannot now certainly understand the difference between the meaning of the four words here used. "It is sufficient," says he, "to know that these reruns stand for some intelligible discourse tending to the edification of the church." Rosenmuller supposes the word "revelation" stands for some "clear and open knowledge of any truth arising from meditation." It is probable that the word here does not refer to divine inspiration, as it usually does, but that it stands opposed to that which is unknown and unintelligible, as that which is "revealed" ἀποκαλύψις apokalupsis stands opposed to what is unknown, concealed, "hidden," obscure. Here, therefore, it is synonymous, perhaps, with "explained." "What shall it profit, unless that which I speak be brought out of the obscurity and darkness of a foreign language, and uncovered or explained!" The original sense of the word "revelation" here is, I suppose, intended ἀποκαλύψις apokalupsis, from ἀποκαλύπτω apokaluptō, "to uncover"), and means that the sense should be uncovered, that is, explained or what was spoken could not be of value.

    Or by knowledge - By making it intelligible. By so explaining it as to make it understood. Knowledge here stands opposed to the "ignorance" and "obscurity" which would attend a communication in a foreign language.

    Or by prophesying - See the note at 1 Corinthians 14:1. That is, unless it be communicated, through interpretation, in the manner in which the prophetic teachers spoke; that is, made intelligible, and explained, and actually brought down to the usual characteristics of communications made in their own language.

    Or by doctrine - By teaching (διδαχῇ didachē). By instruction; in the usual mode of plain and familiar instruction. The sense of this passage, therefore, is clear. Though Paul should utter among them, as he had abundant ability to do, the most weighty and important truths, yet, unless he interpreted what he said in a manner clear from obscurity, like "revelation;" or intelligibly, and so as to constitute "knowledge;" or in the manner that the prophets spoke, in a plain and intelligible manner; or in the manner usual in simple and plain "instruction," it would be useless to them. The perplexities of commentators may be seen stated in Locke, Bloomfield, and Doddridge.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Corinthians 14:6

    14:6 Revelation - Of some gospel mystery. Knowledge - Explaining the ancient types and prophecies. Prophecy - Foretelling some future event. Doctrine - To regulate your tempers and lives. Perhaps this may be the sense of these obscure words.