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1 Corinthians 6:1

    1 Corinthians 6:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Dare any of you, having a matter against another, go to law before the unjust, and not before the saints?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Dare any of you, having a matter against another, go to law before the unjust, and not before the saints?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Dare any of you, having a matter against his neighbor, go to law before the unrighteous, and not before the saints?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    How is it, that if any one of you has a cause at law against another, he takes it before a Gentile judge and not before the saints?

    Webster's Revision

    Dare any of you, having a matter against his neighbor, go to law before the unrighteous, and not before the saints?

    World English Bible

    Dare any of you, having a matter against his neighbor, go to law before the unrighteous, and not before the saints?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Dare any of you, having a matter against his neighbour, go to law before the unrighteous, and not before the saints?

    Definitions for 1 Corinthians 6:1

    Saints - Men and women of God.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 6:1

    Dare any of you, etc. - From the many things that are here reprehended by the apostle, we learn that the Christian Church at Corinth was in a state of great imperfection, notwithstanding there were very many eminent characters among them. Divided as they were among themselves, there was no one person who possessed any public authority to settle differences between man and man; therefore, as one party would not submit to the decisions of another, they were obliged to carry their contentions before heathen magistrates; and probably these very subjects of litigations arose out of their ecclesiastical divisions. The thing, and this issue of it, the apostle strongly reprehends.

    Before the unjust, and not before the saints? - The heathen judges were termed δικασται from their presumed righteousness in the administration of justice; here the apostle, by a paronomasia, calls them αδικοι, unrighteous persons; and it is very likely that at Corinth, where such corruption of manners reigned, there was a great perversion of public justice; and it is not to be supposed that matters relative to the Christians were fairly decided. The Christians the apostle terms ἁγιοι saints, which they were all by profession; and doubtless many were so in spirit and in truth.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 6:1

    Dare any of you - The reasons why the apostle introduced this subject here may have been:

    (1) That he had mentioned the subject of judging 1 Corinthians 5:13, and that naturally suggested the topic which is here introduced; and,

    (2) This might have been a prevailing evil in the church of Corinth, and demanded correction. The word "dare" here implies that it was inconsistent with religion, and improper. "can you do it; is it proper or right; or do you presume so far to violate all the principles of Christianity as to do it."

    Having a matter - A subject of litigation; or a suit. There may be differences between people in regard to property and right, in which there shall be no blame on either side. They may both be desirous of having it equitably and amicably adjusted. It is not a difference between people that is in itself wrong, but it is the spirit with which the difference is adhered to, and the unwillingness to have justice done that is so often wrong.

    Against another - Another member of the congregation. A Christian brother. The apostle here directs his reproof against the "plaintiff," as having the choice of the tribunal before which he would bring the cause.

    Before the unjust - The pagan tribunals; for the word "unjust" here evidently stands opposed to the saints. The apostle does not mean that they were always unjust in their decisions, or that equity could in no case be hoped from them, but that they were classed in that division of the world which was different from the saints, and is synonymous with unbelieveRS, as opposed to believers.

    And not before the saints - Before Christians. Can you not settle your differences among yourselves as Christians, by leaving the cause to your brethren, as arbitrators, instead of going before pagan magistrates? The Jews would not allow any of their causes to be brought before the Gentile courts. Their rule was this, "He that tries a cause before the judges of the Gentiles, and before their tribunals, although their judgments are as the judgments of the Israelites, so this is an ungodly man," etc. Maimon, Hilch, Sanhedrin, chapter 26 section 7. They even looked upon such an action as bad as profaning the name of God.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Corinthians 6:1

    6:1 The unjust - The heathens. A Christian could expect no justice from these. The saints - Who might easily decide these smaller differences in a private and friendly manner.