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1 Corinthians 6:3

    1 Corinthians 6:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Know ye not that we shall judge angels? how much more things that pertain to this life?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Know you not that we shall judge angels? how much more things that pertain to this life?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Know ye not that we shall judge angels? how much more, things that pertain to this life?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Is it not certain that we are to be the judges of angels? how much more then of the things of this life?

    Webster's Revision

    Know ye not that we shall judge angels? how much more, things that pertain to this life?

    World English Bible

    Don't you know that we will judge angels? How much more, things that pertain to this life?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Know ye not that we shall judge angels? how much more, things that pertain to this life?

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 6:3

    Know ye not that we shall judge angels? - Dr. Lightfoot observes that "the apostle does not say here, as he said before, the saints shall judge the angels, but We shall judge them. By angels, all confess that demons are intended; but certainly all saints, according to the latitude with which that word is understood, i.e. all who profess Christianity, shall not judge angels. Nor is this judging of angels to be understood of the last day; but the apostle speaks of the ministers of the Gospel, himself and others, who, by the preaching of the Gospel, through the power of Christ, should spoil the devils of their oracles and their idols, should deprive them of their worship, should drive them out of their seats, and strip them of their dominion. Thus would God subdue the whole world under the Christian power, so that Christian magistrates should judge men, and Christian ministers judge devils."

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 6:3

    Shall judge angels - All the angels that shall be judged, good or bad. Probably the reference is to fallen angels, as there is no account that holy angels will then undergo a trial. The sense is, "Christians will be qualified to see the justice of even the sentence which is pronounced on fallen angels. They will be able so to embrace and comprehend the nature of law, and the interests of justice, as to see the propriety of their condemnation. And if they can so far enter into these important and eternal relations, assuredly they ought to be regarded as qualified to discern the nature of justice 'among men,' and to settle the unimportant differences which may arise in the church." Or, perhaps, this may mean that the saints shall in the future world be raised to a rank in some respects more elevated than even the angels in heaven. (Prof. Stuart.) In what respects they will be thus elevated, if this is the true interpretation, can be only a matter of conjecture. It may be supposed that it will be because they have been favored by being interested in the plan of salvation - a plan that has done so much to honor God; and that "to have been" thus saved by the "immediate and painful" intervention of the Son of God, will be a higher honor than all the privileges which beings can enjoy who are innocent themselves.