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1 Thessalonians 3:3

    1 Thessalonians 3:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    That no man should be moved by these afflictions: for yourselves know that we are appointed thereunto.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    That no man should be moved by these afflictions: for yourselves know that we are appointed thereunto.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    that no man be moved by these afflictions; for yourselves know that hereunto we are appointed.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    So that no man might be moved by these troubles; because you see that these things are part of God's purpose for us.

    Webster's Revision

    that no man be moved by these afflictions; for yourselves know that hereunto we are appointed.

    World English Bible

    that no one be moved by these afflictions. For you know that we are appointed to this task.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    that no man be moved by these afflictions; for yourselves know that hereunto we are appointed.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 3:3

    That no man should be moved - That is, caused to apostatize from Christianity.

    We are appointed thereunto - Εις τουτο κειμεθα· We are exposed to this, we lie open to such, they are unavoidable in the present state of things; as the Latins say, sic est sors nostra, "this is our lot." God appoints nothing of this kind, but he permits it: for he has made man a free agent.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Thessalonians 3:3

    That no man should be moved - The word rendered "moved" (σαίνω sainō) occurs nowhere else in the New Testament. It properly means to wag, to move to and fro, as of dogs which wag their tails in fondness (Hom. Od. K. 216. AEl. A. N. 10:7. Ovid. 14:258); then to caress, to fawn upon, to flatter; then to move or waver in mind - as from fear; to dread, to tremble. See Passow and Wetstein. Here the sense is, to be so moved or agitated by fear, or by the terror of persecution, as to forsake their religion. The object of sending Timothy was, that they might not be thus moved, but that amidst all opposition they might adhere steadfastly to their religion.

    These afflictions - See the notes at 1 Thessalonians 2:14.

    For yourselves know that we are appointed thereunto - It is not quite certain whether by the word "we" here the apostle refers to himself; or to himself and the Thessalonians; or to Christians in general. On either supposition what he says is true, and either would meet the case. It would be most to the purpose, however, to suppose that he means to state the general idea that all Christians are exposed to persecution and could not hope to avoid it. It would then appear that the Thessalonians had partaken only of the common lot. Still there may have been a special reference to the fact that Paul and his fellow-laborers there were subjected to trials; and if this be the reference, then the idea is, that the Thessalonians should not be "moved" by their trials, for even their teachers were not exempt. Even their enemies could not say that the apostle and his co-workers were impostors, for they had persevered in preaching the gospel when they knew that these trials were coming upon them. The phrase, "we are appointed thereunto," means that such was the divine arrangement. No one who professed Christianity could hope to be exempted from trial, for it was the common lot of all believers; compare 1 Corinthians 4:9 note; 2 Timothy 3:12 note.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Thessalonians 3:3

    3:3 We are appointed hereto - Are in every respect laid in a fit posture for it, by the very design and contrivance of God himself for the trial and increase of our faith and all other graces. He gives riches to the world; but stores up his treasure of wholesome afflictions for his children.