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1 Timothy 3:8

    1 Timothy 3:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Likewise must the deacons be grave, not doubletongued, not given to much wine, not greedy of filthy lucre;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Likewise must the deacons be grave, not double-tongued, not given to much wine, not greedy of filthy lucre;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Deacons in like manner must be grave, not double-tongued, not given to much wine, not greedy of filthy lucre;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Deacons, in the same way, are to be serious in their behaviour, not false in word, not given to taking much wine or greatly desiring the wealth of this world;

    Webster's Revision

    Deacons in like manner must be grave, not double-tongued, not given to much wine, not greedy of filthy lucre;

    World English Bible

    Servants, in the same way, must be reverent, not double-tongued, not addicted to much wine, not greedy for money;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Deacons in like manner must be grave, not doubletongued, not given to much wine, not greedy of filthy lucre;

    Definitions for 1 Timothy 3:8

    Lucre - Gain.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Timothy 3:8

    Likewise must the deacons - The term deacon, διακονος, simply signifies a regular or stated servant: from δια, through or emphatic, and κονεω, to minister or serve. See it explained in the note on Matthew 20:26. As nearly the same qualifications were required in the deacons as in the bishops, the reader may consult what is said on the preceding verses.

    Grave - Of a sedate and dignified carriage and conduct.

    Not double-tongued - Speaking one thing to one person, and another thing to another, on the same subject. This is hypocrisy and deceit. This word might also be translated liars.

    Not given to much wine - Neither a drunkard, tippler, nor what is called a jovial companion. All this would be inconsistent with gravity.

    Not greedy of filthy lucre - See on 1 Timothy 3:3 (note).

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Timothy 3:8

    Likewise must the deacons - On the meaning of the word "deacons," see the notes on Philippians 1:1. On their appointment, see the notes, Acts 6:1. The word here evidently denotes those who had charge of the temporal affairs of the church, the poor, etc. No qualifications are mentioned, implying that they were to be preachers of the gospel. In most respects, except in regard to preaching, their qualifications were to be the same as those of the "bishops."

    Be grave - Serious, sober-minded men. In Acts 6:3, it is said that they should be men "of honest report." On the meaning of the word "grave," see the notes on 1 Timothy 3:4. They should be men who by their serious deportment will inspire respect.

    Not double-tongued - The word here used δίλογος dilogos - does not occur elsewhere in the New Testament. It means, properly, uttering the same thing twice (from δίς dis and λέγω legō), and then deceitful, or speaking one thing and meaning another. They should be men who can be relied on for the exact truth of what they say, and for the exact fulfillment of their promises.

    Not given to much wine - see 1 Timothy 3:3. The word "much" is added here to what is said 1 Timothy 3:2 of the qualification of a bishop. It is not affirmed that it would be proper for the deacon, anymore than the bishop, to indulge in the use of wine in small quantities, but it "is" affirmed that a man who is much given to the use of wine ought not, on any consideration, to be a deacon. It may be remarked here, that this qualification was everywhere regarded as necessary for a minister of religion. Even the pagan priests, on entering a temple, did not drink wine. "Bloomfield." The use of wine, and of strong drinks of all kinds, was absolutely prohibited to the Jewish ministers of every rank when they were about to engage in the service of God; Leviticus 10:9. Why should it then be anymore proper for a Christian minister to drink wine than for a Jewish or a pagan priest? Shall a minister of the gospel be less holy than they? Shall he have a feebler sense of the purity of his vocation? Shall he be less careful lest he expose himself to the possibility of conducting the services of religion in an irreverent and silly manner? Shall he venture to approach the altar of God under the influence of intoxicating drinks, when a sense of propriety restrained the pagan priest, and a solemn statue of Yahweh restrained the Jewish priest from doing it?

    Not greedy of filthy lucre - notes, 1 Timothy 3:3. The special reason why this qualification was important in the deacon was, that he would be entrusted with the funds of the church, and might be tempted to appropriate them to his own use instead of the charitable purposes for which they were designed; see this illustrated in the case of Judas, John 12:6.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Timothy 3:8

    3:8 Likewise the deacons must he serious - Men of a grave, decent, venerable behaviour. But where are presbyters? Were this order essentially distinct from that of bishops, could the apostle have passed it over in silence? Not desirous of filthy gain - With what abhorrence does he everywhere speak of this! All that is gained (above food and raiment) by ministering in holy things is filthy gain indeed; far more filthy than what is honestly gained by raking kennels, or emptying common sewers.