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1 Timothy 4:7

    1 Timothy 4:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But refuse profane and old wives' fables, and exercise thyself rather unto godliness.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But refuse profane and old wives' fables, and exercise yourself rather to godliness.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    but refuse profane and old wives fables. And exercise thyself unto godliness:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But have nothing to do with unclean and foolish stories. Give yourself training in religion:

    Webster's Revision

    but refuse profane and old wives fables. And exercise thyself unto godliness:

    World English Bible

    But refuse profane and old wives' fables. Exercise yourself toward godliness.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    but refuse profane and old wives' fables. And exercise thyself unto godliness:

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Timothy 4:7

    But refuse profane and old wives' fables - This seems to refer particularly to the Jews, whose Talmudical writings are stuffed with the most ridiculous and profane fables that ever disgraced the human intellect. It may with equal propriety be applied to the legends of the Romish Church. Let any man read the Aurea Legenda, and he will find of profane and old wives' fables what may stand, with considerable propriety, column for column with the Talmud. See Joseline's Life of St. Patrick for miracles, without rhyme or reason, abundantly more numerous and more stupendous than all the necessary ones wrought by Jesus Christ and his apostles. This is enough to persuade a man that the Spirit of God had these very corruptions and this corrupt Church particularly in view.

    Exercise thyself rather unto godliness - To understand this expression it is necessary to know that the apostle alludes here to the gymnastic exercises among the Greeks, which were intended as a preparation for, their contests at the public games. They did this in order to obtain a corruptible or fading crown, i. e, a chaplet of leaves, which was the reward of those who conquered in those games; Timothy was to exercise himself unto godliness, that he might be prepared for the kingdom of heaven, and there receive a crown that fadeth not away. See the notes on 1 Corinthians 9:24, etc.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Timothy 4:7

    But refuse - That is, refuse to pay attention to them, or reject them. Do not consider them of sufficient importance to occupy your time.

    Profane - The word here used does not mean that the fables here referred to were blasphemous or impious in their character, but that they had not the character of true religion; 2 Timothy 2:16.And old wives' - Old women's stories; or such as old women held to be important. The word is used here, as it is often with us, in the sense of silly.

    Fables - Fictions, or stories that were not founded on fact. The pagan religion abounded with fictions of this kind, and the Jewish teachers were also remarkable for the number of such fables which they had introduced into their system. It is probable that the apostle referred here particularly to the Jewish fables, and the counsel which he gives to Timothy is, to have nothing to do with them.

    And exercise thyself rather unto godliness - Rather than attempt to understand those fables. Do not occupy your time and attention with them, but rather cultivate piety, and seek to become more holy.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Timothy 4:7

    4:7 Like those who were to contend in the Grecian games, exercise thyself unto godliness - Train thyself up in holiness of heart and life, with the utmost labour, vigour, and diligence.