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1 Timothy 5:18

    1 Timothy 5:18 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For the scripture saith, Thou shalt not muzzle the ox that treadeth out the corn. And, The labourer is worthy of his reward.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For the scripture said, You shall not muzzle the ox that treads out the corn. And, The laborer is worthy of his reward.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For the scripture saith, Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn. And, The laborer is worthy of his hire.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For the Writings say, It is not right to keep the ox from taking the grain when he is crushing it. And, The worker has a right to his reward.

    Webster's Revision

    For the scripture saith, Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn. And, The laborer is worthy of his hire.

    World English Bible

    For the Scripture says, "You shall not muzzle the ox when it treads out the grain." And, "The laborer is worthy of his wages."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For the scripture saith, Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn. And, The labourer is worthy of his hire.

    Definitions for 1 Timothy 5:18

    Scripture - That which is written; book; letter.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:18

    The Scripture saith, Thou shalt not muzzle the ox - This is a manifest proof that by τιμη, honor, in the preceding verse, the apostle means salary or wages: "Let the elders that rule well be accounted worthy of double honor," a larger salary than any of the official widows mentioned before, for "the laborer is worthy of his hire." The maintenance of every man in the Church should be in proportion to his own labor, and the necessities of his family. He that does no work should have no wages. In the Church of Christ there never can be a sinecure. They who minister at the altar should live by the altar; the ox that treadeth out the corn should not be muzzled; the laborer is worthy of his hire: but the altar should not support him who does not minister at it; if the ox won't tread out the corn, let him go to the common or be muzzled; if the man will not labor, let him have no hire.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Timothy 5:18

    For the Scripture saith - This is adduced as a reason why a church should show all due respect and care for its ministers. The reason is, that as God took care to make provision for the laboring ox, much more should due attention be paid to those who labor for the welfare of the church.

    Thou shalt not muzzle the ox - see this passage explained, and its bearing on such an argument shown, in the notes on 1 Corinthians 9:8-10.

    And, The labourer is worthy of his reward - This expression is found substantially in Matthew 10:10, and Luke 10:7. It does not occur in so many words in the Old Testament, and yet the apostle adduces it evidently as a quotation from the Scriptures, and as authority in the case. It would seem probable, therefore, that he had seen the Gospel by Matthew or by Luke, and that he quoted this as a part of Scripture, and regarded the Book from which he made the quotation as of the same authority as the Old Testament. If so, then this may be regarded as an attestation of the apostle to the inspiration of the "Gospel" in which it was found.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Timothy 5:18

    5:18 Deut 25:4