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1 Timothy 5:8

    1 Timothy 5:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But if any provide not for his own, and specially for those of his own house, he hath denied the faith, and is worse than an infidel.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But if any provide not for his own, and specially for those of his own house, he has denied the faith, and is worse than an infidel.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But if any provideth not for his own, and specially his own household, he hath denied the faith, and is worse than an unbeliever.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    If anyone has no care for his family and those in his house, he is false to the faith, and is worse than one who has no faith.

    Webster's Revision

    But if any provideth not for his own, and specially his own household, he hath denied the faith, and is worse than an unbeliever.

    World English Bible

    But if anyone doesn't provide for his own, and especially his own household, he has denied the faith, and is worse than an unbeliever.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But if any provideth not for his own, and specially his own household, he hath denied the faith, and is worse than an unbeliever.

    Definitions for 1 Timothy 5:8

    Infidel - An unbeliever.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:8

    But if any provide not for his own - His own people or relatives.

    Those of his own house - That is, his own family, or a poor widow or relative that lives under his roof.

    Hath denied the faith - The Christian religion, which strongly inculcates love and benevolence to all mankind.

    Is worse than an infidel - For what are called the dictates of nature lead men to feel for and provide for their own families. Heathen writers are full of maxims of this kind; Tacitus says: Liberos cuique ac propinquos Natura carissimos esse voluit. "Nature dictates that to every one his own children and relatives should be most dear." And Cicero, in Epist. ad Caption: Suos quisque debet tueri. "Every man should take care of his own family."

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Timothy 5:8

    But if any provide not for his own - The apostle was speaking 1 Timothy 5:4 particularly of the duty of children toward a widowed mother. In enforcing that duty, he gives the subject, as he often does in similar cases, a general direction, and says that all ought to provide for those who were dependent on them, and that if they did not do this, they had a less impressive sense of the obligations of duty than even the pagan had. On the duty here referred to, compare Romans 12:17 note; 2 Corinthians 8:21 note. The meaning is, that the person referred to is to think beforehand (προνοεἶ pronoei) of the probable needs of his own family, and make arrangements to meet them. God thus provides for our needs; that is, he sees beforehand what we shall need, and makes arrangements for those needs by long preparation. The food that we eat, and the raiment that we wear, he foresaw that we should need, and the arrangement for the supply was made years since, and to meet these needs he has been carrying forward the plans of his providence in the seasons; in the growth of animals; in the formation of fruit; in the bountiful harvest. So, according to our measure, we are to anticipate what will be the probable needs of our families, and to make arrangements to meet them. The words "his own," refer to those who are naturally dependent on him, whether living in his own immediate family or not. There may be many distant relatives naturally dependent on our aid, besides those who live in our own house.

    And specially for those of his own house - Margin, "kindred." The word "house," or "household," better expresses the sense than the word "kindred." The meaning is, those who live in his own family. They would naturally have higher claims on him than those who did not. They would commonly be his nearer relatives, and the fact, from whatever cause, that they constituted his own family, would lay the foundation for a strong claim upon him. He who neglected his own immediate family would be more guilty than he who neglected a more remote relative.

    He hath denied the faith - By his conduct, perhaps, not openly. He may be still a professor of religion and do this; but he will show that he is imbued with none of the spirit of religion, and is a stranger to its real nature. The meaning is, that he would, by such an act, have practically renounced Christianity, since it enjoins this duty on all. We may hence learn that it is possible to deny the faith by conduct as well as by words; and that a neglect of doing our duty is as real a denial of Christianity as it would be openly to renounce it. Peter denied his Lord in one way, and thousands do the same thing in another. He did it in words; they by neglecting their duty to their families, or their duty in their closets, or their duty in attempting to send salvation to their fellow-men, or by an openly irreligious life. A neglect of any duty is so far a denial of the faith.

    And is worse than an infidel - The word here does not mean an infidel, technically so called, or one who openly professes to disbelieve Christianity, but anyone who does not believe; that is, anyone who is not a sincere Christian. The word, therefore, would include the pagan, and it is to them, doubtless, that the apostle particularly refers. They acknowledged the obligation to provide for their relatives. This was one of the great laws of nature written on their hearts, and a law which they felt bound to obey. Few things were inculcated more constantly by pagan moralists than this duty. Gelgacus, in Tacitus, says, "Nature dictates that to every one, his own children and relatives should be most dear." Cicero says, "Every man should take care of his own family " - suos quisque debet tueri; see Rosenmuller, in loc., and also numerous examples of the same kind quoted from Apuleius, Cicero, Plutarch, Homer, Terence, Virgil, and Servius, in Pricaeus, in loc. The doctrine here is:

    (1) that a Christian ought not to be inferior to an unbeliever in respect to any virtue;

    (2) that in all that constitutes true virtue he ought to surpass him;

    (3) that the duties which are taught by nature ought to be regarded as the more sacred and obligatory from the fact that God has given us a better religion; and,

    (4) that a Christian ought never to give occasion to an enemy of the gospel to point to a man of the world and say, "there is one who surpasses you in any virtue."

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Timothy 5:8

    5:8 If any provide not - Food and raiment. For his own - Mother and grandmother, being desolate widows. He hath - Virtually. Denied the faith - Which does not destroy, but perfect, natural duties. What has this to do with heaping up money for our children, for which it is often so impertinently alleged? But all men have their reasons for laying up money. One will go to hell for fear of want; another acts like a heathen, lest he should be worse than an infidel.

    Verses Related to 1 Timothy 5:8

    Philippians 4:19 - But my God shall supply all your need according to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus.
    Luke 16:9 - And I say unto you, Make to yourselves friends of the mammon of unrighteousness; that, when ye fail, they may receive you into everlasting habitations.
    Proverbs 22:7 - The rich ruleth over the poor, and the borrower is servant to the lender.