Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

2 Corinthians 6:12

    2 Corinthians 6:12 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Ye are not straitened in us, but ye are straitened in your own bowels.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    You are not straitened in us, but you are straitened in your own bowels.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Ye are not straitened in us, but ye are straitened in your own affections.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    It is not our feelings to you which are narrow, but yours to us.

    Webster's Revision

    Ye are not straitened in us, but ye are straitened in your own affections.

    World English Bible

    You are not restricted by us, but you are restricted by your own affections.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Ye are not straitened in us, but ye are straitened in your own affections.

    Definitions for 2 Corinthians 6:12

    Bowels - Inward parts; affections.
    Straitened - Hindered; impeded.

    Clarke's Commentary on 2 Corinthians 6:12

    Ye are not straitened in us - That is, Ye have not a narrow place in our affections: the metaphor here is taken from the case of a person pent up in a small or narrow place, where there is scarcely room to breathe.

    Ye are straitened in your own bowels - I have not the same place in your affections which you have in mine. The bowels are used in Scripture to denote the most tender affections. See the note on Matthew 9:36.

    Barnes' Notes on 2 Corinthians 6:12

    Ye are not straitened in us - That is, you do not possess a narrow or contracted place in our affections. We love you fully, ardently, and are ready to do all that can be done for your welfare. There is no lack of room in our affections toward you. It is not narrow, confined, pent up. It is ample and free.

    But ye are straitened in your own bowels - That is, in the affections of your hearts. The word used here (σπλάγχνα splangchna) commonly means in the Bible the tender affections. The Greek word properly denotes the upper viscera; the heart, the lungs, the liver. It is applied by Greek writers to denote those parts of victims which were eaten during or after the sacrifice - Robinson (Lexicon). Hence, it is applied to the heart, as the seat of the emotions and passions; and especially the gentler emotions, the tender affections, compassion, pity, love, etc. Our word "bowels" is applied usually to the lower viscera, and by no means expresses the idea of the word which is used in Greek. The idea here is, that they were straitened, or were confined in their affections for him. It is the language of reproof, meaning that he had not received from them the demonstrations of attachment which he had a right to expect, and which was a fair and proportionate return for the love bestowed on them. Probably he refers to the fact that they had formed parties; had admitted false teachers; and had not received his instructions as implicitly and as kindly as they ought to have done.

    Wesley's Notes on 2 Corinthians 6:12

    6:12 Ye are not straitened in us - Our heart is wide enough to receive you all. But ye are straitened in your own bowels - Your hearts are shut up, and so not capable of the blessings ye might enjoy.