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2 Corinthians 6:4

    2 Corinthians 6:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But in all things approving ourselves as the ministers of God, in much patience, in afflictions, in necessities, in distresses,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But in all things approving ourselves as the ministers of God, in much patience, in afflictions, in necessities, in distresses,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    but in everything commending ourselves, as ministers of God, in much patience, in afflictions, in necessities, in distresses,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But in everything making it clear that we are the servants of God, in quiet strength, in troubles, in need, in sorrow,

    Webster's Revision

    but in everything commending ourselves, as ministers of God, in much patience, in afflictions, in necessities, in distresses,

    World English Bible

    but in everything commending ourselves, as servants of God, in great endurance, in afflictions, in hardships, in distresses,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    but in everything commending ourselves, as ministers of God, in much patience, in afflictions, in necessities, in distresses,

    Clarke's Commentary on 2 Corinthians 6:4

    But in all things approving ourselves - The apostle now proceeds to show how conscientiously himself and his fellow laborers acted, in order to render the ministry of reconciliation effectual to the salvation of men. They not only gave no offense in any thing, but they labored to manifest themselves to be the genuine ministers of God, in much patience - bearing calmly up under the most painful and oppressive afflictions.

    In afflictions - Εν θλιψεσιν. This may signify the series of persecutions and distresses in general; the state of cruel suffering in which the Church of God and the apostles then existed.

    In necessities - Εν αναγκαις· Straits and difficulties; including all that want and affliction which arose from the impoverished state of the Church.

    In distresses - Εν στενοχωριαις. Such straits and difficulties as were absolutely unavoidable and insurmountable. The word implies, being reduced to a narrow place, driven to a corner, hemmed in on every side, as the Israelites were at the Red Sea; the sea before them, Pharaoh and his host behind them, and Egyptian fortresses on either hand. God alone could bring them out of such difficulties, when their enemies themselves saw that the wilderness had shut them in. So was it often with the apostles; all human help failed, and their deliverance came from God alone.

    Barnes' Notes on 2 Corinthians 6:4

    But in all things - In every respect. In all that we do. In every way, both by words and deeds. How this was done, Paul proceeds to state in the following verses.

    Approving ourselves as the ministers of God - Margin, "Commending." Tyndale renders it, "In all things let us behave ourselves as the ministers of God." The idea is, that Paul and his fellowlaborers endeavored to live as became the ministers of God, and so as to commend the ministry to the confidence and affection of people. They endeavored to live as was appropriate to those who were the ministers of God, and so that the world would be disposed to do honor to the ministry.

    In much patience - In the patient endurance of afflictions of all kinds. Some of his trials he proceeds to enumerate. The idea is, that a minister of God, in order to do good and to commend his ministry, should set an example of patience. He preaches this as a duty to others; and if, when he is poor, persecuted, oppressed, calumniated, or imprisoned, he should complain, or be insubmissive, the consequence would be that he would do little good by all his preaching. And no one can doubt, that God often places his ministers in circumstances of special trial, among other reasons, in order that they may illustrate their own precepts by their example, and show to their people with what temper and spirit they may and ought to suffer. Ministers often do a great deal more good by their example in suffering than they do in their preaching. It is easy to preach to others; it is not so easy to manifest just the right spirit in time of persecution and trial. People too can resist preaching, but they cannot resist the effect and power of a good example in times of suffering. In regard to the manner in which Paul says that the ministry may commend itself, it may be observed, that he groups several things together; or mentions several classes of influences or means. In this and the next verse he refers to various kinds of afflictions. In the following verses he groups several things together, pertaining to a holy life, and a pure conversation.

    In afflictions - In all our afflictions; referring to all the afflictions and trials which they were called to bear. The following words, in the manner of a climax, specify more particularly the kinds of trials which they were called to endure.

    In necessities - This is a stronger term than afflictions, and denotes the distress which arose from want. He everywhere endured adversity. It denotes unavoidable distress and calamity.

    In distresses - The word used here (στενοχωρία stenochōria) denotes properly straitness of place, lack of room; then straits, distress, anguish. It is a stronger word than either of those which he had before used. See it explained in the notes on Romans 2:9. Paul means that in all these circumstances he had evinced patience, and had endeavored to act as became a minister of God.

    Wesley's Notes on 2 Corinthians 6:4

    6:4 But approving ourselves as the ministers of God - Such as his ministers ought to be. In much patience - Shown, In afflictions, necessities, distresses - All which are general terms. In stripes, imprisonments, tumults - Which are particular sorts of affliction, necessity, distress In labours, watchings, fastings - Voluntarily endured. All these are expressed in the plural number, to denote a variety of them. In afflictions, several ways to escape may appear, though none without difficulty in necessities, one only, and that a difficult one; in distresses, none at all appears.