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2 Peter 1:9

    2 Peter 1:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But he that lacketh these things is blind, and cannot see afar off, and hath forgotten that he was purged from his old sins.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But he that lacks these things is blind, and cannot see afar off, and has forgotten that he was purged from his old sins.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For he that lacketh these things is blind, seeing only what is near, having forgotten the cleansing from his old sins.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For the man who has not these things is blind, seeing only what is near, having no memory of how he was made clean from his old sins.

    Webster's Revision

    For he that lacketh these things is blind, seeing only what is near, having forgotten the cleansing from his old sins.

    World English Bible

    For he who lacks these things is blind, seeing only what is near, having forgotten the cleansing from his old sins.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For he that lacketh these things is blind, seeing only what is near, having forgotten the cleansing from his old sins.

    Clarke's Commentary on 2 Peter 1:9

    But he that lacketh these things - He, whether Jew or Gentile, who professes to have Faith in God, and has not added to that Faith fortitude, knowledge, temperance, patience, godliness, brotherly kindness, and universal love; is blind - his understanding is darkened, and cannot see afar off, μυωπαζων, shutting his eyes against the light, winking, not able to look truth in the face, nor to behold that God whom he once knew was reconciled to him: and thus it appears he is wilfully blind, and hath forgotten that he was purged from his old sins - has at last, through his nonimprovement of the grace which he received from God, his faith ceasing to work by love, lost the evidence of things not seen; for, having grieved the Holy Spirit by not showing forth the virtues of him who called him into his marvellous light, he has lost the testimony of his sonship; and then, darkness and hardness having taken place of light and filial confidence, he first calls all his former experience into doubt, and questions whether he has not put enthusiasm in the place of religion. By these means his darkness and hardness increase, his memory becomes indistinct and confused, till at length he forgets the work of God on his soul, next denies it, and at last asserts that the knowledge of salvation, by the remission of sins, is impossible, and that no man can be saved from sin in this life. Indeed, some go so far as to deny the Lord that bought them; to renounce Jesus Christ as having made atonement for them; and finish their career of apostasy by utterly denying his Godhead. Many cases of this kind have I known; and they are all the consequence of believers not continuing to be workers together with God, after they had experienced his pardoning love.

    Reader, see that the light that is in thee become not darkness; for if it do, how great a darkness!

    Barnes' Notes on 2 Peter 1:9

    But he that lacketh these things is blind - He has no clear views of the nature and the requirements of religion.

    And cannot see afar off - The word used here, which does not occur elsewhere in the New Testament, (μυωπάζων muōpazōn,) means to shut the eyes; i. e., to contract the eyelids, to blink, to twinkle, as one who cannot see clearly, and hence to be "near-sighted." The meaning here is, that he is like one who has an indistinct vision; one who can see only the objects that are near him, but who has no correct apprehension of objects that are more remote. He sees but a little way into the true nature and design of the gospel. He does not take those large and clear views which would enable him to comprehend the whole system at a glance.

    And hath forgotten that he was purged from his old sins - He does not remember the obligation which grows out of the fact that a system has been devised to purify the heart, and that he has been so far brought under the power of that system as to have his sins forgiven. If he had any just view of that, he would see that he was under obligation to make as high attainments as possible, and to cultivate to the utmost extent the Christian graces.

    Wesley's Notes on 2 Peter 1:9

    1:9 But he that wanteth these - That does not add them to his faith. Is blind - The eyes of his understanding are again closed. He cannot see God, or his pardoning love. He has lost the evidence of things not seen. Not able to see afar off - Literally, purblind. He has lost sight of the precious promises: perfect love and heaven are equally out of his sight. Nay, he cannot now see what himself once enjoyed. Having, as it were, forgot the purification from his former sins - Scarce knowing what he himself then felt, when his sins were forgiven.