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2 Thessalonians 3:17

    2 Thessalonians 3:17 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The salutation of Paul with mine own hand, which is the token in every epistle: so I write.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The salutation of Paul with my own hand, which is the token in every letter: so I write.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    The salutation of me Paul with mine own hand, which is the token in every epistle: so I write.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    These words of love to you at the end are in my writing, Paul's writing, and this is the mark of every letter from me.

    Webster's Revision

    The salutation of me Paul with mine own hand, which is the token in every epistle: so I write.

    World English Bible

    The greeting of me, Paul, with my own hand, which is the sign in every letter: this is how I write.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The salutation of me Paul with mine own hand, which is the token in every epistle: so I write.

    Definitions for 2 Thessalonians 3:17

    Epistle - A Hebrew measurement.
    Salutation - A greeting.

    Clarke's Commentary on 2 Thessalonians 3:17

    The salutation of Paul with mine own hand - It is very likely that Paul employed an amanuensis generally, either to write what he dictated, or to make a fair copy of what he wrote. In either case the apostle always subscribed it, and wrote the salutation and benediction with his own hand; and this was what authenticated all his epistles. A measure of this kind would be very necessary if forged epistles were carried about in those times. See the note on 1 Corinthians 16:21, and see Colossians 4:18 (note).

    Barnes' Notes on 2 Thessalonians 3:17

    The salutation of Paul with mine own hand; - See the notes, 1 Corinthians 16:21. "Which is the token in every epistle." Greek: "sign." That is, this signature is a sign or proof of the genuineness of the epistle; compare the notes on Galatians 6:11.

    So I write - Referring, probably, to some mark or method which Paul had of signing his name, which was well known, and which would easily be recognized by them.