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2 Timothy 2:3

    2 Timothy 2:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Thou therefore endure hardness, as a good soldier of Jesus Christ.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    You therefore endure hardness, as a good soldier of Jesus Christ.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Suffer hardship with me , as a good soldier of Christ Jesus.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Be ready to do without the comforts of life, as one of the army of Christ Jesus.

    Webster's Revision

    Suffer hardship with me , as a good soldier of Christ Jesus.

    World English Bible

    You therefore must endure hardship, as a good soldier of Christ Jesus.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Suffer hardship with me, as a good soldier of Christ Jesus.

    Clarke's Commentary on 2 Timothy 2:3

    Endure hardness - He considers a Christian minister under the notion of a soldier, not so much for his continual conflicts with the world, the devil, and the flesh, for these are in a certain sense common to all Christians, but for the hardships and difficulties to which he must be exposed who faithfully preaches the Gospel of Christ.

    Barnes' Notes on 2 Timothy 2:3

    Thou therefore endure hardness, as a good soldier of Jesus Christ - Such hardships as a soldier is called to endure. The apostle supposes that a minister of the gospel might be called to endure hardships, and that it is reasonable that he should be as ready to do it as a soldier is. On the hardships which he endured himself, see the notes at 2 Corinthians 11:23-29. Soldiers often endure great privations. Taken from their homes and friends; exposed to cold, or heat, or storms, or fatiguing marches; sustained on coarse fare, or almost destitute of food, they are often compelled to endure as much as the human frame can bear, and often indeed, sink under their burdens, and die. If, for reward or their country's sake, they are willing to do this, the soldier of the cross should be willing to do it for his Saviour's sake, and for the good of the human race. Hence, let no man seek the office of the ministry as a place of ease. Let no one come into it merely to enjoy himself. Let no one enter it who is not prepared to lead a soldier's life and to welcome hardship and trial as his portion. He would make a bad soldier, who, at his enlistment, should make it a condition that he should be permitted to sleep on a bed of down, and always be well clothed and fed, and never exposed to peril, or compelled to pursue a wearisome march. Yet do not some men enter the ministry, making these the conditions? And would they enter the ministry on any other terms?