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Acts 10:14

    Acts 10:14 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But Peter said, Not so, Lord; for I have never eaten any thing that is common or unclean.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But Peter said, Not so, Lord; for I have never eaten any thing that is common or unclean.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But Peter said, Not so, Lord; for I have never eaten anything that is common and unclean.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But Peter said, No, Lord; for I have never taken food which is common or unclean.

    Webster's Revision

    But Peter said, Not so, Lord; for I have never eaten anything that is common and unclean.

    World English Bible

    But Peter said, "Not so, Lord; for I have never eaten anything that is common or unclean."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But Peter said, Not so, Lord; for I have never eaten anything that is common and unclean.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 10:14

    Common or unclean - By common, κοινον, whatever was in general use among the Gentiles is to be understood; by ακαθαρτον, unclean, every thing that was forbidden by the Mosaic law. However, the one word may be considered as explanatory of the other. The rabbins themselves, and many of the primitive fathers, believed that by the unclean animals forbidden by the law the Gentiles were meant.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 10:14

    I have never eaten ... - In the Old Testament God had made a distinction between clean and unclean animals. See Leviticus 11:2-27; Deuteronomy 14:3-20. This law remained in the Scriptures, and Peter pled that he had never violated it, implying that he could not now violate it, as it was a law of God, and that, as it was unrepealed, he did not dare to act in a different manner from what it required. Between that law and the command which he now received in the vision there was an apparent variation, and Peter naturally referred to the well known and admitted written Law. One design of the vision was to show him that that Law was now to pass away.

    That is common - This word properly denotes "what pertains to all," but among the Jews, who were bound by special laws, and who were prohibited from many things that were freely indulged in by other nations, the word "common" came to be opposed to the word "sacred," and to denote what was in common use among the pagans, hence, that which was "profane," or "polluted." Here it means the same as "profane," or "forbidden."

    Unclean - Ceremonially unclean; that is, what is forbidden by the ceremonial law of Moses.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 10:14

    10:14 But Peter said, In nowise, Lord - When God commands a strange or seemingly improper thing, the first objection frequently finds pardon. But it ought not to be repeated. This doubt and delay of St. Peter had several good effects. Hereby the will of God in this important point was made more evident and incontestable. And Peter also, having been so slow of belief himself, could the more easily bear the doubting of his brethren, Acts 11:2, and c.