Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Acts 10:36

    Acts 10:36 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The word which God sent unto the children of Israel, preaching peace by Jesus Christ: (he is Lord of all:)

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The word which God sent to the children of Israel, preaching peace by Jesus Christ: (he is Lord of all:)

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    The word which he sent unto the children of Israel, preaching good tidings of peace by Jesus Christ (He is Lord of all.) --

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The word which he sent to the children of Israel, giving the good news of peace through Jesus Christ (who is Lord of all)--

    Webster's Revision

    The word which he sent unto the children of Israel, preaching good tidings of peace by Jesus Christ (He is Lord of all.) --

    World English Bible

    The word which he sent to the children of Israel, preaching good news of peace by Jesus Christ--he is Lord of all--

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The word which he sent unto the children of Israel, preaching good tidings of peace by Jesus Christ (he is Lord of all)--

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 10:36

    The word which God sent, etc. - Few verses in the New Testament have perplexed critics and divines more than this. The ancient copyists seem also to have been puzzled with it; as the great variety in the different MSS. sufficiently proves. A foreign critic makes a good sense by connecting this with the preceding verse, thus: In every nation he that feared him and worketh righteousness is accepted with him, according to that doctrine which God sent unto the children of Israel, by which he published peace (i.e. reconciliation between Jews and Gentiles) by Jesus Christ, who is Lord of all; and, because Lord of all, both of Jews and Gentiles, therefore he must be impartial; and, because impartial, or no respecter of persons, therefore, in every nation, whether Judea, Greece, or Italy, he that feareth God, and worketh righteousness, is accepted with him.

    I believe τον λογον, the word, in this verse, should be translated, that doctrine; and probably ῥημα, which we translate that word in Acts 10:37, should be omitted as it is in the Codex Bezae, and its Itala version; and if ὁν, which is in Acts 10:36, be even left out, as it is in ABC, Coptic and Vulgate, the whole may be literally read thus: As to the doctrine sent to the children of Israel, preaching the glad tidings of peace (ευαγγελιζομενος ειρηνην) by Jesus Christ, he is Lord of all, ye know what was done (το γενομενον) through all Judea, beginning after the baptism which John preached. Jesus, who was from Nazareth, whom God anointed with the Holy Ghost, and with mighty power (δυναμει) went about doing good, and healing all that were tyrannically oppressed (καταδυναϚευομενους) by the devil, for God was with him. Critics have proposed a great variety of modes by which they suppose these verses may be rendered intelligible; and the learned reader may see many in Wolfius, Kypke, Rosenmuller, and others. Kypke contends that the word Κυριος, Lord, is to be understood adjectively, and ought to be referred to λογος, and the 36th verse will then stand thus: The word which he sent to the children of Israel, preaching peace by Jesus Christ, that word has authority over all. This amounts nearly to the same sense with the expositions given above; and all proclaim this truth, which the apostle labored to establish, namely, that God intended the salvation of all men by Jesus Christ; and therefore proclaimed reconciliation to all, by him who is Lord, maker, preserver, redeemer, and judge of all. And of this the apostle was now more convinced by the late vision; and his mission from him who is Lord of all to Cornelius, a heathen, was a full illustration of the heavenly truth; for the very meeting of Peter, once a prejudiced Jew, and Cornelius, once an unenlightened Gentile, was a sort of first fruits of this general reconciliation, and a proof that Jesus was Lord of All.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 10:36

    The word - That is, this is the Word, or "the doctrine." Few passages in the New Testament have perplexed critics more than this. It has been difficult to ascertain to what the term "word" in the accusative case τὸν λόγον ton logon here refers. Our translation would lead us to suppose that it is synonymous with what is said in the following verse. But it should be remarked that the term used there, and translated "word," as if it were a repetition of what is said here, is a different term. It is not λόγον logon, but ῥῆμα rēma - a word, a thing; not a doctrine. I understand the first term "word" to be an introduction of the doctrine which Peter set forth, and to be governed by a preposition understood. The whole passage may be thus expressed: Peter had been asked to teach Cornelius and his assembled friends. It was expected, of course, that he would instruct him in regard to the true doctrines of religion - the doctrine which had been communicated to the Jews. He commences, therefore, with a statement respecting the true doctrine of the Messiah, or the way of salvation which was now made known to the Jews. "In regard to the Word, or the doctrine which God sent to the children of Israel, proclaiming peace through Jesus Christ (who is Lord of all), you know already what was done, or the transactions which occurred throughout all Judea, from Galilee, where he commenced his ministry after John had preached, that this was by Jesus Christ, since God had anointed him," etc. Peter here assumes that Cornelius had some knowledge of the principal events of the life of the Saviour, though it was obscure and imperfect; and his discourse professes only to state this more fully and clearly.

    Unto the children of Israel - To the Jews. The Messiah was promised to them, and spent his life among them.

    Preaching - That is, proclaiming, or announcing. God did this by Jesus Christ.

    Peace - This word sometimes refers to the peace or union which was made between Jews and Gentiles, by breaking down the wall of division between them. But it is used here in a wider sense, to denote "peace or reconciliation with God." He announced the way by which man might be reconciled to God, and might find peace.

    He is Lord of all - That is, Jesus Christ. He is sovereign, or ruler of both Jews and Gentiles, and hence, Peter saw the propriety of preaching the gospel to one as to the other. See John 17:2; Matthew 28:18; Ephesians 1:20-22. The word "Lord" used here does not necessarily imply divinity, but only that the Lord Jesus, as Mediator, had been constituted or appointed Lord or Ruler over all nations. It is true, however, that this is a power which we cannot conceive to have been delegated to one that was not divine. Compare Romans 9:5.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 10:36

    10:36 This is the word which God sent - When he sent his Son into the world, preaching - Proclaiming by him - peace between God and man, whether Jew or Gentile, by the God - man. He is Lord of both; yea, Lord of and over all.