Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Acts 24:26

    Acts 24:26 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    He hoped also that money should have been given him of Paul, that he might loose him: wherefore he sent for him the oftener, and communed with him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    He hoped also that money should have been given him of Paul, that he might loose him: why he sent for him the oftener, and communed with him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    He hoped withal that money would be given him of Paul: wherefore also he sent for him the oftener, and communed with him.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For he was hoping that Paul would give him money: so he sent for him more frequently and had talk with him.

    Webster's Revision

    He hoped withal that money would be given him of Paul: wherefore also he sent for him the oftener, and communed with him.

    World English Bible

    Meanwhile, he also hoped that money would be given to him by Paul, that he might release him. Therefore also he sent for him more often, and talked with him.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    He hoped withal that money would be given him of Paul: wherefore also he sent for him the oftener, and communed with him.

    Definitions for Acts 24:26

    Wherefore - Why?; for what reason?; for what cause?

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 24:26

    He hoped also that money should have been given him - Bp. Pearce asks, "How could St. Luke know this?" To which I:answer: From the report of St. Paul, with whom Felix had frequent conferences, and to whom he undoubtedly expressed this wish. We may see, here, the most unprincipled avarice, in Felix, united to injustice. Paul had proved before him his innocence of the charges brought against him by the Jews. They had retired in confusion when he had finished his defense. Had Felix been influenced by the common principles of justice, Paul had been immediately discharged; but he detained him on the hope of a ransom. He saw that Paul was a respectable character; that he had opulent friends; that he was at the head of a very numerous sect, to whom he was deservedly dear; and he took it, therefore, for granted that a considerable sum of money would be given for his enlargement. Felix was a freed man of the Emperor Claudius; consequently, had once been a slave. The stream rises not above its source: the meanness of the slave is still apparent, and it is now insufferable, being added to the authority and influence of the governor. Low-bred men should never be intrusted with the administration of public affairs.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 24:26

    He hoped also - He thought that by giving him access to his friends, and by often meeting him himself, and showing kindness, Paul might be induced to attempt to purchase his freedom with a bribe.

    That money should have been given him of Paul - That Paul would give him money to procure a release. This shows the character of Felix. He was desirous of procuring a bribe. Paul had proved his innocence, and should have been at once discharged. But Felix was influenced by avarice, and he therefore detained Paul in custody with the hope that, wearied with confinement, he would seek his release by a bribe. But Paul offered no bribe. He knew what was justice, and he would not be guilty, therefore, of attempting to purchase what was his due, or of gratifying a man who prostituted his high office for the purposes of gain. The Roman governors in the provinces were commonly rapacious and avaricious, like Felix. They usually took the office for its pecuniary advantage, and they consequently usually disregarded justice, and made the procuring of money their leading object.

    He sent for him the oftener - It may seem remarkable that he did not fear that he would again become alarmed. But the hope of money overcame all this. Having once resisted the reasoning of Paul, and the strivings of the Spirit of God, he seems to have had no further alarm or anxiety. He could again hear the same man, and the same truth, unaffected. When sinners have once grieved God's Spirit, they often sit with unconcern under the same truth which once alarmed them, and become entirely hardened and unconcerned.

    And communed with him - And conversed with him.