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Acts 3:18

    Acts 3:18 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But those things, which God before had shewed by the mouth of all his prophets, that Christ should suffer, he hath so fulfilled.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But those things, which God before had showed by the mouth of all his prophets, that Christ should suffer, he has so fulfilled.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But the things which God foreshowed by the mouth of all the prophets, that his Christ should suffer, he thus fulfilled.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But the things which God had made clear before, by the mouth of all the prophets, that the Christ would have to undergo, he has put into effect in this way.

    Webster's Revision

    But the things which God foreshowed by the mouth of all the prophets, that his Christ should suffer, he thus fulfilled.

    World English Bible

    But the things which God announced by the mouth of all his prophets, that Christ should suffer, he thus fulfilled.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But the things which God foreshewed by the mouth of all the prophets, that his Christ should suffer, he thus fulfilled.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 3:18

    But those things - he hath so fulfilled - Your ignorance and malice have been overruled by the sovereign wisdom and power of God, and have become the instruments of fulfilling the Divine purpose, that Christ must suffer, in order to make an atonement for the sin of the world. All the prophets had declared this; some of them in express terms, others indirectly and by symbols; but, as the whole Mosaic dispensation referred to Christ, all that prophesied or ministered under it must have referred to him also.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 3:18

    But those things - To wit, those things that did actually occur, pertaining to the life and death of the Messiah.

    Had showed - Had announced, or foretold.

    By the mouth of all his prophets - That is, by the prophets in general, without affirming that each individual prophet had uttered a distinct prediction respecting this. The prophets "taken together," or the prophecies "as a whole," had declared this. The word "all" is not infrequently used in this somewhat limited sense, Mark 1:37; John 3:26. In regard to the prophecies respecting Christ, see the notes on Luke 24:27.

    Hath so fulfilled - He has caused to be fulfilled in this manner; that is, by the rejection, the denial, and the wickedness of the rulers. It has turned out to be in strict accordance with the prophecy. This fact Peter uses in exhorting them to repentance; but it is not to be regarded as an excuse for their sins. The mere fact that all this was foretold; that it was in accordance with the purposes and predictions of God, does not take away the quilt of it, or constitute an excuse for it. In regard to this, we may remark:

    (1) The prediction did not change the nature of the act. The mere fact that it was foretold, or foreknown, did not change its character. See notes on Acts 1:23.

    (2) Peter still regarded them as guilty. He did not urge the fact that this was foreknown as an excuse for their sin, but to show them that since all this happened according to the prediction and the purpose of God, they might hope in his mercy. The plan was that the Messiah should die to make a way for pardon, and, therefore, they might hope in his mercy.

    (3) this was a signal instance of the power and mercy of God in overruling the wicked conduct of people to further his own purposes and plans.

    (4) all the other sins of people may thus be overruled, and thus the wrath of man may be made to praise him. But,

    (5) This will constitute no excuse for the sinner. It is no part of his intention to honor God, or to advance his purposes; and there is no direct tendency in his crimes to advance his glory. The direct tendency of his deeds is counteracted and overruled, and God brings good out of the evil. But this surely constitutes no excuse for the sinner.

    If it be asked why Peter insisted on this if he did not mean that it should be regarded as an excuse for their sin, I reply, that it was his design to prove "that Jesus was the Messiah," and having proved this, he could assure them that there was mercy. Not that they had not been guilty; not that they deserved favor; but that tire fact that the Messiah had come was an argument which proved that any sinners might obtain mercy, as he immediately proceeds to show them.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 3:18

    3:18 But God - Who was not ignorant, permitted this which he had foretold, to bring good out of it.

    Verses Related to Acts 3:18

    2 Corinthians 7:9 - Now I rejoice, not that ye were made sorry, but that ye sorrowed to repentance: for ye were made sorry after a godly manner, that ye might receive damage by us in nothing.
    2 Corinthians 7:10 - For godly sorrow worketh repentance to salvation not to be repented of: but the sorrow of the world worketh death.
    Mark 1:4 - John did baptize in the wilderness, and preach the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins.
    Book: Acts
    Topic: Repentence