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Acts 3:8

    Acts 3:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And he leaping up stood, and walked, and entered with them into the temple, walking, and leaping, and praising God.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And he leaping up stood, and walked, and entered with them into the temple, walking, and leaping, and praising God.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And leaping up, he stood, and began to walk; and he entered with them into the temple, walking, and leaping, and praising God.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And, jumping up, he got on to his feet and went into the Temple with them, walking and jumping and giving praise to God.

    Webster's Revision

    And leaping up, he stood, and began to walk; and he entered with them into the temple, walking, and leaping, and praising God.

    World English Bible

    Leaping up, he stood, and began to walk. He entered with them into the temple, walking, leaping, and praising God.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And leaping up, he stood, and began to walk; and he entered with them into the temple, walking, and leaping, and praising God.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 3:8

    Walking and leaping, and praising God - These actions are very naturally described. He walked, in obedience to the command of the apostle, rise up and walk: he leaped, to try the strength of his limbs and to be convinced of the reality of the cure: he praised God, as a testimony of the gratitude he felt for the cure he had received. Now was fulfilled, in the most literal manner, the words of the Prophet Isaiah, Isaiah 35:6 : The lame man shall leap as a hart.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 3:8

    And he, leaping up - This was a natural expression of joy, and it was a striking fulfillment of the prophecy in Isaiah 35:6; "Then shall the lame man leap as an hart." The account here given is one that is perfectly natural. The man would be filled with joy, and would express it in this manner. He had been lame from a child; he had never walked; and there was more in the miracle than merely giving strength. The art of "walking" is one that is acquired by long practice. Children learn slowly. Caspar Hauser, discovered in one of the cities of Germany, who had been confined in prison from a child, was unable to walk in an easy way when released, but stumbled in a very awkward manner (see his Life). When, therefore, this man was able at once to walk, it was clear proof of a miracle.

    Praising God - This was the natural and appropriate expression of his feelings on this occasion. His heart would be full; and he could have no doubt that this blessing had come from God alone. It is remarkable that he did not even express his gratitude to Peter and John. They had not pretended to restore him in their own name, and he would feel that man could not do it. It is remarkable that he praised God without being taught or entreated to do it. It was instinctive - the natural feeling of the heart. So a sinner. His first feelings, when he is converted, will be to ascribe the praise to God. While he may and will feel regard for the ministry by whose instrumentality he has received the blessing, yet his main expression of gratitude will be to God. And this he will do instinctively. He needs no prompter; he knows that no power of man is equal to the work of converting the soul, and will rejoice, and give all the praise to the God of grace.
    Book: Acts