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Acts 5:31

    Acts 5:31 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Him hath God exalted with his right hand to be a Prince and a Saviour, for to give repentance to Israel, and forgiveness of sins.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Him has God exalted with his right hand to be a Prince and a Savior, for to give repentance to Israel, and forgiveness of sins.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Him did God exalt with his right hand to be a Prince and a Saviour, to give repentance to Israel, and remission of sins.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Him God has put on high at his right hand, as a Ruler and a Saviour, to give to Israel a change of heart and forgiveness of sins.

    Webster's Revision

    Him did God exalt with his right hand to be a Prince and a Saviour, to give repentance to Israel, and remission of sins.

    World English Bible

    God exalted him with his right hand to be a Prince and a Savior, to give repentance to Israel, and remission of sins.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Him did God exalt with his right hand to be a Prince and a Saviour, for to give repentance to Israel, and remission of sins.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 5:31

    Him hath God exalted with his right hand - By a supereminent display of his almighty power, for so the right hand of God often means; he has raised him from the dead, and raised his human nature to the throne of his glory. Instead of δεξιᾳ, the right hand, the Codex Bezae has δοξῃ, to glory.

    A Prince - The leader or director in the way. See the notes on Acts 3:15, Acts 3:19.

    And a Savior - Σωτηρα, A deliverer or preserver. The word σωτηρ comes from σωω to save, deliver, preserve, escape from death or danger, bring into a state of security or safety. Jesus and Saviour are nearly of the same import. See the note on John 1:17. He alone delivers from sin, death, and hell: by him alone we escape from the snares and dangers to which we are exposed: and it is by and in him, and in connection with him, that we are preserved blameless and harmless, and made the sons of God without rebuke. He alone can save the soul from sin, and preserve it in that state of salvation.

    To give repentance - See this explained, Matthew 3:2 (note).

    Forgiveness of sins - Αφεσιν των ἁμαρτιων, The taking away of sins. This is not to be restrained to the mere act of justification; it implies the removal of sin, whether its power, guilt, or impurity be considered. Through Jesus we have the destruction of the power, the pardon of the guilt, and the cleansing from the pollution, of sin. And was Jesus Christ exalted a Prince and a Savior to give repentance and remission of sins to Israel? Then none need despair. If such as were now before the apostles could be saved, then the salvation of the very worst of transgressors, of any or all on this side perdition, is gloriously possible. Yes, for he tasted death for every man; and he prayed for his murderers, compared to some of whom Judas himself was a saint.

    The two words in Italics, in this text, to be, are impertinently introduced; it reads much better without them.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 5:31

    Him hath God exalted - See the notes on Acts 2:33.

    To be a Prince - ἀρχηγὸν archēgon. See the notes on Acts 3:15. In that place he is called the "Prince of life." Here it means that he is actually in the "exercise" of the office of a prince or a king, at the right hand of his Father. The title "Prince," or "King," was one which was well known as applied to the Messiah. It denotes that he has "dominion" and "power," especially the power which is needful to give repentance and the pardon of sins.

    A Saviour - See the notes on Matthew 1:21.

    To give repentance - The word "repentance" here is equivalent to "reformation" and "a change of life." The sentiment does not differ from what is said in Acts 3:26.

    To Israel - This word properly denotes the "Jews"; but his office was not to be confined to the Jews. Other passages show that it would be also extended to the "Gentiles." The reasons why the "Jews" are particularly specified here are, probably:

    (1) Because the Messiah was long promised to the Jewish people, and his first work was there; and,

    (2) Because Peter was addressing Jews, and was particularly desirous of leading "them" to repentance.

    Forgiveness of sins - Pardon of sin; the act which can be performed by God only, Mark 2:7.

    If it be asked in what sense the Lord Jesus "gives repentance," or how his "exaltation" is connected with it, we may answer:

    (1) His exaltation is evidence that his work was accepted, and that thus a foundation is laid by which repentance is available, and may be connected with pardon. Unless there was some way of "forgiveness," sorrow for sin would be of no value, even if exercised. The relentings of a culprit condemned for murder will be of no avail unless the executive can "consistently" pardon him; nor would relentings in hell be of avail, for there is no promise of forgiveness. But Jesus Christ by his death has laid a foundation by which repentance "may be" accepted.

    (2) he is entrusted with all power in heaven and earth with "reference" to this, to apply his work to people; or, in other words, to bring them to repentance. See John 17:2; Matthew 28:18.

    (3) his exaltation is immediately connected with the bestowment of the Holy Spirit, by whose influence people are brought to repentance, John 16:7-11. The Spirit is represented as being "sent" by him as well as by the Father, John 15:26; John 16:7.

    (4) Jesus has power in this state of exaltation over all things that can affect the mind. He sends his ministers; he directs the events of sickness or disappointment, of health or prosperity, that will influence the heart. There is no doubt that he can so recall the sins of the past life, and refresh the memory, as to overwhelm the soul in the consciousness of guilt. Thus also he can appeal to man by his "goodness," and by a sense of his mercies; and especially he can so present a view of "his own" life and death as to affect the heart, and show the evil of the past life of the sinner. Knowing the heart, he knows all the avenues by which it can be approached, and in an instant he can overwhelm the soul with the remembrance of crime.

    It was "proper" that the power of pardon should be lodged with the same being that has the power of producing repentance, because:

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    Wesley's Notes on Acts 5:31

    5:31 Him hath God exalted - From the grave to heaven; to give repentance - Whereby Jesus is received as a Prince; and forgiveness of sins - Whereby he is received as a Saviour. Hence some infer, that repentance and faith are as mere gifts as remission of sins. Not so: for man co - operates in the former, but not in the latter. God alone forgives sins.