Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Daniel 1:12

    Daniel 1:12 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Prove thy servants, I beseech thee, ten days; and let them give us pulse to eat, and water to drink.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Prove your servants, I beseech you, ten days; and let them give us vegetables to eat, and water to drink.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Prove thy servants, I beseech thee, ten days; and let them give us pulse to eat, and water to drink.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Put your servants to the test for ten days; let them give us grain for our food and water for our drink.

    Webster's Revision

    Prove thy servants, I beseech thee, ten days; and let them give us pulse to eat, and water to drink.

    World English Bible

    Test your servants, I beg you, ten days; and let them give us vegetables to eat, and water to drink.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Prove thy servants, I beseech thee, ten days; and let them give us pulse to eat, and water to drink.

    Definitions for Daniel 1:12

    Beseech - To call upon; appeal; beg.
    Let - To hinder or obstruct.
    Pulse - Bean or seed used for food.

    Clarke's Commentary on Daniel 1:12

    Give us pulse to eat - הזרעים hazzeraim, seeds or grain, such as barley, wheat, rye, and peas, etc. Though a vegetable diet might have produced that healthiness of the system in general, and of the countenance particularly, as mentioned here; yet we are to understand that there was an especial blessing of God in this, because this spare diet was taken on a religious account.

    Barnes' Notes on Daniel 1:12

    Prove thy servants, I beseech thee, ten days - A period which would indicate the probable result of the entire experiment. If during that period there were no indications of diminished health, beauty, or vigour, it would not be unfair to presume that the experiment in behalf of temperance would be successful, and it would not be improper then to ask that it might be continued longer.

    And let them give us pulse to eat - Margin, "of pulse that we may eat." Hebrew, "Let them give us of pulse, and we will eat." The word "pulse" with us means leguminous plants with thin seeds; that is, plants with a pericarp, or seed-vessel, of two valves, having the seeds fixed to one suture only. In popular language the "legume" is called a "pod;" as a "pea-pod," or "bean-pod," and the word is commonly applied to peas or beans. The Hebrew word (זרעים zēro‛ı̂ym) would properly have reference to seeds of any kind - from זרע zâra‛, to disperse, to scatter seed, to sow. Then it would refer to plants that bear seed, of all kinds, and would be by no means limited to pulse - as pease or beans. It is rendered by Gesenius, "seed-herbs, greens, vegetables; i. e., vegetable food, such as was eaten in half-fast, opposed to meats and the more delicate kinds of food." The word occurs only here and in Daniel 1:16. It is rendered in the Vulgate, "legumina;" and in the Greek, ἀπὸ τῶν σπερμάτων apo tōn spermatōn - "from seeds." It is not a proper construction to limit this to "pulse," or to suppose that Daniel desired to live solely on pease or beans; but the fair interpretation is to apply it to what grows up from "seeds" - such, probably, as would be sown in a garden, or, as we would now express it, "vegetable diet." It was designed as an experiment - and was a very interesting one - to show the legitimate effect of such a diet in promoting beauty and health, and the result is worthy of special notice as contrasted with a more luxurious mode of life.

    And water to drink - This, also, was a most interesting and important experiment, to show that wine was not necessary to produce healthfulness of appearance, or manly strength and beauty. It was an experiment to illustrate the effect of "cold water" as a beverage, made by an interesting group of young men, when surrounded by great temptations, and is, therefore, worthy of particular attention.