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Daniel 12:8

    Daniel 12:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And I heard, but I understood not: then said I, O my Lord, what shall be the end of these things?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And I heard, but I understood not: then said I, O my Lord, what shall be the end of these things?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And I heard, but I understood not: then said I, O my lord, what shall be the issue of these things?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And the words came to my ears, but the sense of them was not clear to me: then I said, O my lord, what is the sense of these things?

    Webster's Revision

    And I heard, but I understood not: then said I, O my lord, what shall be the issue of these things?

    World English Bible

    I heard, but I didn't understand: then I said, my lord, what shall be the issue of these things?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And I heard, but I understood not: then said I, O my lord, what shall be the issue of these things?

    Clarke's Commentary on Daniel 12:8

    I heard, but I understand not - Could not comprehend what the time, times, and half time should refer to. These make three years and a half of prophetic times answering to one thousand two hundred and sixty years.

    Barnes' Notes on Daniel 12:8

    And I heard, but I understood not - He understood not the full significance of the language employed - "a time, and times, and an half." This would make it probable that there was something more intended than merely three years and a half as the period of the continuation of these troubles. Daniel saw, apparently from the manner of the angel, as well as from the terms which he used, that there was something mystical and unusual in those terms, and he says, therefore, that he could not understand their full import.

    Then said I, O my Lord - A term of civil address. The language is such as would be used by an inferior when respectfully addressing one of superior rank. It is not a term that is peculiarly appropriate to God, or that implies a Divine nature, but is here given to the angel as an appellation of respect, or as denoting one of superior rank.

    What shall be the end of these things? - Indicating great anxiety to know what was to be the termination of these wonders. The "end" had been often referred to in the communication of the angel, and now he had used an enigmatical expression as referring to it, and Daniel asks, with great emphasis, when the end was to be.

    Wesley's Notes on Daniel 12:8

    12:8 What shall be the end - What is the meaning of all this?