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Daniel 2:12

    Daniel 2:12 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Because of this the king was angry and full of wrath, and gave orders for the destruction of all the wise men of Babylon.

    Webster's Revision

    For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

    World English Bible

    For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

    Barnes' Notes on Daniel 2:12

    For this cause the king was angry - Because they failed in explaining the subject which had been referred to them. It is true that his anger was unjust, for their profession did not imply that they would undertake to explain what he demanded, but his wrath was not unnatural. His mind was alarmed, and he was troubled. He believed that what he had seen in his dream foreboded some important events, and, as an arbitrary sovereign, unaccustomed to restrain his anger or to inquire into the exact jusrice of matters which excited Iris indignation, it was not unnatural that he should resolve to wreak his vengeance on all who made any pretensions to the arts of divining.

    And very furious - Wrought up to the highest degree of passion. Chaldee, "Much enraged." It was not a calm and settled purpose to execute his threat, but a purpose attended with a high degree of excitement.

    And commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon - That is, all who made pretensions to this kind of wisdom; all who came under the wellknown denomination of "wise men," or "sages." He had called that class before him Daniel 2:2; he had demanded of them an explanation of his dream; he had been assured by the leading men among them, the Chaldeans Daniel 2:10-11, that they could not recall his dream; and, as he supposed that all who could be relied on in such a case had failed, he resolved to cut them off as impostors.

    Where Daniel was at this time is not known. It would seem, however, that from some reason he had not been summoned before the king with the others, probably because, although he had shown himself to be eminently endowed with wisdom Daniel 1:20, he had not yet made any pretensions to this kind of knowledge, and was not numbered with the Magi, or Chaldeans. When, however, the decree went forth that "all" the "wise men of Babylon" should be slain, the exhibition of wisdom and knowledge made by him Daniel 1:18-20 was recollected, and the executioners of the sentence supposed that tie and his companions were included in the general instructions. Whether the word "Babylon" here relates to the city of Babylon, or to the whole realm, there is no certain way of determining. Considering, however, the character of Oriental despotisms, and the cruelty to which absolute sovereigns have usually been transported in their passion, there would be no improbability in supposing that the command included the whole realm, though it is probable that most of this class would be found in the capital.