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Daniel 2:33

    Daniel 2:33 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    His legs of iron, his feet part of iron and part of clay.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    His legs of iron, his feet part of iron and part of clay.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    its legs of iron, its feet part of iron, and part of clay.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Its legs of iron, its feet were in part of iron and in part of potter's earth.

    Webster's Revision

    its legs of iron, its feet part of iron, and part of clay.

    World English Bible

    its legs of iron, its feet part of iron, and part of clay.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    his legs of iron, his feet part of iron, and part of clay.

    Clarke's Commentary on Daniel 2:33

    His legs of iron - The Roman government.

    His feet part of iron and part of clay - The same, mixed with the barbaric nations, and divided into ten kingdoms. See at the end of the chapter.

    Barnes' Notes on Daniel 2:33

    His legs of iron - The portion of the lower limbs from the knees to the ankles. This is undoubtedly the usual meaning of the English word "legs," and it as clearly appears to be the sense of the original word here. Iron was regarded as inferior to either of the other metals specified, and yet was well adapted to denote a kingdom of a particular kind - less noble in some respects, and yet hardy, powerful, and adapted to tread down the world by conquest. On the application of this, see the notes at Daniel 2:40.

    His feet part of iron and part of clay - As to his feet; or in respect to his feet, they were partly of iron and partly of clay - a mixture denoting great strength, united with what is fragile and weak. The word rendered "clay" in this place (חסף chăsaph) is found nowhere else except in this chapter, and is always rendered "clay," Daniel 2:33-35, Daniel 2:41 (twice), 42, 43 (twice), 45. In some instances Daniel 2:41, Daniel 2:43, the epithet "miry" is applied to it. This would seem to imply that it was not "burnt or baked clay," or "earthenware," as Professor Bush supposes, but clay in its natural state. The idea would seem to be, that the framework, so to speak, was iron, with clay worked in, or filling up the interstices, so as to furnish an image of strength combined with what is weak. That it would be well adapted represent a kingdom that had many elements of permanency in it, yet that was combined with things that made it weak - a mixture of what was powerful with what was liable to be crushed; capable of putting forth great efforts, and of sustaining great shocks, and yet having such elements of feebleness and decay as to make it liable to be overthrown. For the application of this, see the notes at Daniel 2:41-43.